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Category — Markets

Bloomberg’s breathtaking propaganda piece suggests trouble for Samsung

Daniel Eran Dilger

An article written for Bloomberg by Jun Yang, Anand Krishnamoorthy and Jungah Lee seeks so desperately to distract from Samsung’s looming crisis that it bends facts backwards and rewrites history with the careless abandon of a North Korea state reporter, drawing attention instead to the curious lack of reality that the company’s defenders exude.
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February 12, 2013   15 Comments

Radio: Apple stock, Blackberry, Microsoft Surface & more

Nightowl logo

Gene Steinberg of the Tech Night Owl invited me to talk about Apple and the stock market, Blackberry, Microsoft’s Surface and of course, Android.

You can tune into the live broadcast stream Saturday night from 7:00 to 10:00 PM Pacific, 10:00 PM to 1:00 AM Eastern, at http://www.technightowl.com/radio/. An archive of the show is available for downloading and listening at your convenience within four hours after the original broadcast.

The Tech Night Owl LIVE is also broadcast on many local radio stations via the GCN network. There’a also now a mobile app for GCN radio.

You can also access the show’s Podcast feed, now available at: http://www.technightowl.com/nightowl.xml.

February 2, 2013   No Comments

Bored by iPhone 5? Careful, you might get what you’re asking for

Daniel Eran Dilger

An awful lot of media wonks are jumping on the bandwagon of registering their lack of excitement over the new iPhone 5. But what they’re asking for is far worse.
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September 13, 2012   33 Comments

Dan Lyons strings together the most misinformation of his career to besmirch iPhone 5 launch

Daniel Eran Dilger

In a stunning effort to express how uninterested he is in the new iPhone, Dan Lyons has compiled for the BBC what appears to be the longest uninterrupted series of false statements ever.
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September 12, 2012   17 Comments

What’s Tim Cook’s “One More Thing” for iPhone 5?

Daniel Eran Dilger

Apple’s chief executive Tim Cook said the company would be “doubling down” on product security, but you wouldn’t get that impression from all the leaks surrounding iPhone 5. It appears we’ve already seen it all, without even needing Gizmodo to find a stolen prototype this time around.

September 5, 2012   22 Comments

Apple’s iOS 6 Passbook is a new Game Center for retail apps

Daniel Eran Dilger

Apple’s new Passbook feature in iOS 6 isn’t just a coupon app; it’s a Game Center-like framework that enables retailers to develop smart apps for transactions, without relying on new Near Field Communications (NFC) hardware to do so.
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September 4, 2012   3 Comments

Apple adds Flyover, deletes Google’s Street View from iOS 6 Maps

Daniel Eran Dilger

Apple is incorporating advanced 3D imaging to bring a variety of new features to iOS users, from building outlines to topographical terrain to fully rendered 3D models that not only replace Google’s StreetView, but offer to provide 360 degree views across neighborhoods, behind buildings and even off roads.
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August 31, 2012   15 Comments

Apple is gaining power because of profits

Daniel Eran Dilger

Ready to be blown away by an epiphany of the obvious? All of the talk over the last 20 years about how “delivering innovation” was the factor selecting success in the tech world was wrong. Here’s why.
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July 24, 2012   17 Comments

Apple’s 15 years of NeXT

Daniel Eran Dilger

Fifteen years ago, Apple announced plans to acquire NeXT Software, a move that would ultimately bring Steve Jobs back to the company he cofounded twenty years earlier.
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December 21, 2011   9 Comments

Verizon soaking high end Android buyers to make up for iPhone subsidies

Daniel Eran Dilger

Apple has negotiated generous subsidies from mobile carriers to sell iPhones at lower upfront prices, but Google and its Android licensees haven’t, leaving carriers such as Verizon to drive up the price of higher end Android phones to make up the difference.
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December 15, 2011   31 Comments

Inside Anobit: Why Apple is investing in flash RAM technology

Daniel Eran Dilger

Apple’s investments in acquiring flash RAM expertise and technology appear to be centered around packing more storage capacity into Macs and iOS devices at lower prices, with the same level of component reliability and longevity.
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December 14, 2011   7 Comments

iOSchadenfreude

Daniel Eran Dilger

Here’s some choice examples of why you can’t believe everything companies or pundits proclaim about the prospects of their products.
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August 19, 2011   9 Comments

Google moves Android from a PlaysForSure strategy to Zune strategy

Daniel Eran Dilger

While Android fans like to point out how well the free software is performing by looking at its plurality of market share among smartphone makers, the reality is that Android isn’t doing so well. Google’s acquisition of Motorola is proof of that.
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August 15, 2011   20 Comments

Are software patents evil?

Daniel Eran Dilger

Ask anyone covering the patent wars currently being waged between Oracle and Google, or between Apple and HTC and Motorola and Kodak, or Lodsys and iOS developers, and regardless of their opinion about legal liability they’ll tell you that the patent system is broken, and more often than not, that patents on software are sort of evil and should probably just go away. But are patents really that bad?
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August 9, 2011   40 Comments

Apple’s Safari grows to 8% browser share, WebKit now second only to Microsoft IE

Apple’s Safari browser has now exceeded an 8 percent share of web browser use across all devices, powered by strong growth in iPhone and iPad sales.

The new high water mark for Apple’s web browser, combined with Google’s popular Chrome browser, also now makes Apple’s WebKit the second most widely used rendering engine among web browsers, second only to Microsoft’s Internet Explorer and just slightly ahead of Mozilla’s Firefox.

According to Net Application’s NetMarketShare data, in the last two years, Microsoft’s IE has slipped from nearly 67 percent share to just 52.8, while Firefox use has slipped slightly from almost 23 percent to July’s reported 21.48. Google’s Chrome as exploded from 2.84 percent to 13.45 percent, while Apple’s Safari share has nearly doubled from 4.07 percent to 8.05 percent.

Chrome and Safari combined now represent more than 21.5 percent of web users, slightly ahead of Firefox even before adding in a small number of alternative WebKit browsers.

A decade ago, Microsoft’s share of web browsing with the Windows-bundled IE reached such overwhelmingly high numbers that it appeared unlikely that any other browser could ever gain more than a scrap of market share, given the apparent lack of any profit incentive to develop an alternative web browser.

The failing Netscape Navigator browser was eventually spun off into an open source project that resulted in Mozilla, which developed the Firefox browser. Its advantages in speed and other features, combined with its independence from Microsoft, quickly created an avid following among both PC and Mac users.

The Rise of Safari and WebKit

In 2003, Apple debuted work on its own Safari browser, after Microsoft stopped actively developing IE for the Mac. Apple leveraged the existing, open source KHTML rendering engine, which it forked to deliver WebCore, a parallel project Apple continued to maintain under the GNU LGPL.

Two years later, Apple released its entire layout engine for Safari under the more permissive BSD license, naming the entire package WebKit. This package proved to be far more valuable to third parties than just the core KHTML-based rendering engine, causing WebKit to immediately be adopted by Nokia for use in its smartphone web browser for Symbian.

Google later adopted WebKit for use in both its desktop Chrome and mobile Android browsers. RIM’s modern BlackBerry 6.0 browser and HP’s webOS browser and entire application runtime are also based on WebKit, as are the majority of other mobile browsers, including Amazon’s latest Kindle browser. WebKit is also used within a variety of applications, ranging from Apple’s own Mail, iTunes and Dashboard to Adobe’s AIR and Creative Suite CS5 and Valve’s Steam gaming platform.

Widespread use of WebKit has enabled Apple (and other WebKit developers) to rapidly deliver and deploy new web standards ranging from Apple’s Canvas to a variety of enhancements to CSS, HTML and SVG, without worrying that there won’t be enough modern browsers available to take advantage of the new features. This has enabled the development of a new open platform for sophisticated web applications, commonly referred to as HTML5.

Shifting the industry toward HTML5

Apple’s successful development of not just a desktop browser in the model of Firefox but also the creation of Mobile Safari for iOS devices as the first very usable, high performance mainstream mobile browser (something Mozilla has yet to deliver itself) has left a tremendous mark not only on the web browser market but in web-related development as well.

The exclusive use of HTML and JavaScript on Apple’s iOS devices without any provision for plugins such as Adobe Flash and Microsoft Silverlight has upended Adobe’s control over the deployment of web video and other dynamic content, forcing the company to bring its development tools to an open HTML5 foundation in order to reach the valuable iOS segment of the market.

Microsoft has also largely abandoned Silverlight, its own Flash-like development environment, to instead focus on standard HTML5 tools for building web apps and services.

August 1, 2011   5 Comments