Daniel Eran Dilger in San Francisco
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Apple’s iPhone and the Curious World of Android Enthusiasts

Daniel Eran Dilger

It’s Saturday so I made some Keynote slides instead of writing a whole lot.

El iPhone de Apple y el Curioso Mundo de los Entusiastas de Android (en español)
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Oh Android Enthusiasts, you never cease to entertain. Click to enlarge.

With Microsoft and Nokia working on their own product, Android Enthusiasts will be like the Tea Party minus corporate-backed Republicans: little more than a really pushy religion. The rest of 2011 should be lots of fun to watch.

58 comments

1 Zeta2099 { 02.19.11 at 1:00 pm }

I just can say… Love it!! :P
For some reason the ppl married with the idea of openess of android remind me of people like Glen Beck… talking about Anti-crist relating with Obama, all evil… but if you say “torture is bad” you are a socialist-comunist scumbag… Oh the humanity.

2 Mike { 02.19.11 at 2:04 pm }

You make a good point here and I don’t disagree. Plus it’s a good laugh at times! But there are definitely things that Apple could improve upon, namely App Store policies and approving apps.

3 gctwnl { 02.19.11 at 3:30 pm }

Very nice.

There is of course one important way Android is more open than Apple: Google does not decide what apps I can put on my Phone, while Apple decides what is in the App Store and without jail breaking I cannot put other apps on that phone.

And I wonder if I can download the source of Darwin for iPhone somewhere, adapt it and run my own iOS version without Apple’s closed layer. I can (presumably) run Android without Google’s layer.

Still, those things do not really tempt me. I’m planning to get my iPhone and iPad this year.

[According to Andy Rubin's "definition of open," you can apparently download Android 2.3 via "mkdir android ; cd android ; repo init -u git://android.git.kernel.org/platform/manifest.git ; repo sync ; make" but I don't know of anyone who has got their phone working with that trick. I wonder if it will enable 3.0 to run on a new Motorola Atrix or even get 2.2 to load on a HTC Hero.

Oh right, the answer is NO. - Dan ]

4 JohnWatkins { 02.19.11 at 4:42 pm }

gctwnl,
While I have issues with the few silly/stupid things Apple has done with content regulation, they usually seem to work it out pretty well in the end. And personally, for an important and basic device I rely on everyday, I prefer a bit regulation and accountability to a “free” environment without rule of law.

WRT Darwin, have at it! I believe (but don’t know for sure) that all the parts are in OS X and then some additions in iOS.
http://www.opensource.apple.com/

5 elppa { 02.19.11 at 5:06 pm }

The Linux bit in slide one is another problem with Android. The Linux kernel which all other Linux distros run isn’t apparently good enough for Google:

“But the larger problem, he continues, is that Android uses a new lock type, new hooks for its “sometimes bizarre” security model, and a revamped framebuffer driver infrastructure. All this, he says, prevents “a large chunk” of Android drivers and platform code from merging into the main kernel tree.

Google, he ultimately argues, has forked its mobile OS.”

I really thought these keynote slides were good and got to the point well. The most radical Android enthusiasts are incredibly difficult to understand and follow. I normally give up.

[Yeah it is interesting that Google tried to check its changes into the mainstream Linux project but ran into problems, so it gave up. Other firms have similarly given up trying to check in realtime kernel features into Linux, or anything else the Linux leaders don't want. It's interesting to compare this against Apple trying to work with KHTML, and the difference in the way the story is reported. Apple's relationship with the BSDs is also a lot more professional, but then again, it's BSD, not an ideologically driven GPL project. - Dan]

6 elppa { 02.19.11 at 5:07 pm }
7 nextguy { 02.19.11 at 5:55 pm }

“[According to Andy Rubin's "definition of open," you can apparently download Android 2.3 via "mkdir android ; cd android ; repo init -u git://android.git.kernel.org/platform/manifest.git ; repo sync ; make" but I don't know of anyone who has got their phone working with that trick. I wonder if it will enable 3.0 to run on a new Motorola Atrix or even get 2.2 to load on a HTC Hero.

Oh right, the answer is NO. - Dan ]”

Average user? No. Third party ROM sites? Every day.

Plenty of trash apps on apple as well.

oo.apple.com still is necessary for opting out of personalized iads.

Funny also that Verizon likes to adware android phones but T-Mobile and others don’t.

Somehow I remember apple using the iphone name before it had the right to do so, but whatever, that’s 4 year old crap. But if you want to drive home the point that google stole the logo for android as well, then neither of them are really different. One’s just not around to care anymore.

Each side of the slide has its advantages and disadvantages. To claim that only Linux nerds and android enthusiasts only appreciate them is quite wrong.

Or, if you want to call them nerds, then I guess we should call iphone users sheeple, cultists followers or other stupid derogatory stereotypes.

8 relativity { 02.19.11 at 7:18 pm }

Humans being humans we have tendencies to envy other people’s possessions – tangible or otherwise.

Hence, iOS has become viral since the ‘nerds’ lined up in droves in malls across America (to subsequently cry and complain for Apple had dropped their MSRP a few months later – ha ha that was so funny).

The same ‘human curiosity’ phenomenon is happening for Android in the middle part of the market. iOS can’t possibly fit everyone’s tastes and budgets. That is something that is completely misunderstood by this proto-journalism. Not everyone think and act like you – you are unique and everyone else for that matter. No amount of calling dirty names to the other platform can deflate its momentum. “To each its own” of how they handle notifications, multitasking, cut-and-paste, so forth. There are things better to be said and done on a Saturday morning than lambasting your chosen foe in Android and its ‘nerdy’ enthusiasts.

OK, so iOS is now mainstream and pretty much saturated the high-end of the ‘nerd’ market (including me and you, it seems) and the rest of the lay people will have to be converted some other ways beside those cute icons and smooth curves and external antenna traces and what not.

These un-nerdy folks value their hard-earned money as their most-valuable possession. There is not a whole lot left when you take out the basic necessities – home rent/mortgage, cable/electric/internet/water bills, $4 gas fillups, hungry kids – for anything other than a $39 (give-or-take) wireless plans. What planet are you from if this is news to you?

So with Android’s penetration down under iOS’ golden carpet is understandable. There is some ‘truth’ in the saying that something “is good enough, is good enough”. I have played with friends HTC Evo’s and Moto Droids and have come to conclusion that for iOS to actually beat Android, Apple have to be willing to play down-market and release an iPhone mini and nano.

Price is what wins for the bottom of the market and I have doubts Apple will play there. Therefore, it isn’t inconceivable that iOS will eventually settle for only ~10-20% of the market within 5 years.

Profitable? Very. Domination? Don’t count on it!

9 sanjay.mehta { 02.19.11 at 8:20 pm }

The only Apple product I don’t own is the iPhone, and that’s because (a) Apple doesn’t sell the 4 in India – we’re stuck with the obsolete 3GS (b) even though it’s at full price, it’s tied up with one or two operators.

I recently bought the Nexus S (at full price, without a contract) as a replacement for a Nokia and it does whatever I need without the idiotic restrictions. Battery life is as bad as an iPhone. Nokias go for days without failing.

Btw, Nokia’s Ovi Maps beats the pants off Google Maps on both Android and IOS. Pity about the rest of the platform.

10 FreeRange { 02.19.11 at 9:06 pm }

@relativity – there really is nothing “relative” in your little rant above. First, iPhone users in large part are far from “nerdy”. On the contrary. They love things that just work, are incredibly easy to use, and provide outstanding value in the use and management of their digital lives. All provided by the iPhone. Second, Apple has by no means “pretty much saturated the market”. In fact they still can’t keep up with production and have yet to roll out their existing devices to the entire world. As to your last silly statement about bottom of the market and “10-20% of the market”, how do you explain the iPod? BTW – 20% of the worldwide market, and 80% of the profits, would be quite nice thank you very much.

11 FreeRange { 02.19.11 at 9:06 pm }

BTW Daniel – Brilliant piece as always!

12 Zeta2099 { 02.19.11 at 10:37 pm }

@Relativity.
I think that’s the real problem… the issue… The Fandroids love to accuse iPhone (and for the matter the iOS) of things like “Closed, Evil, etc” that doesn’t have anything to do with the real problem… like “we don’t like the iOS we want something different”.
Well kudos for you!!! I mean nobody should make you buy something you don’t want, what is going on with the ideological crap that drives the discussion when you talk about a gadget like the iPhone?
You like it or you don’t but don’t bring us the stupid argument of closed/open to the table… I mean political argument is found everywhere but why put it in the middle of a something that is only about taste or choice of preferences?
We love Apple, I guess that’s why we are so passionate about somethings but discussing issues based on convictions rather than on facts is like discussing religion.
The fact is that you can use different formats in your iPhone, iPod etc. That is enough open for me.
You can’t install programs outside the iTunes store. Same as you can’t modify or install things that aren’t compatible with your Playstation 3 or modify it cause it will void the warranty. So what’s the big problem?
Someone has called sony evil? Closed? Well maybe but not by me.. and I have all the consoles from Sony.
Daniel has to respond to this “arguments” cause they are basically crap based on convictions, preconceived beliefs, deformation of reality etc.
We can try to be the better man and don’t put much attention on such outrageous stupidity but it comes to… “I have to respond to such nonsense”.
If you don’t like it… Fine! Just don’t buy it but don’t come with things like open/closed for the goddess sake!
We know things can be better, and many things should be improving for the iOS, MacOS, iPhones or iPads etc. Again Apple is not perfect but if we discuss with facts and not beliefs we can advance.

13 relativity { 02.19.11 at 11:08 pm }

“In fact they still can’t keep up with production and have yet to roll out their existing devices to the entire world.”

Exactly my point and they never will be.

Apple, by its very lonesome, will not cover 100% of the market with just one form factor of the iPhone. If you believe this then I must say you are crazy.

Every big handset manufacturer is flooding the smartphone market with Android with only 100 measly percentage points to go around. iOS will be happy with ~20 por ciento my friend. Android some north of 40%. The rest of the crumbs to webOS, WP7, and others.

Fact: there are over 1 Billion, with a capital B, handsets shipped worldwide each and every year. Don’t be a fool to believe that mighty Apple can produce any more than about 100 million. There are limits to what Apple’s billions gonna be capable of doing if those same billions happen to be coercing or bribing their own enemies (Samsung? LG?) to go along with your domination plans.

Meanwhile, the Chinese contract manufacturers (namely Foxconn, Asustek) are only going along the iPhone ride to have a peek at Apple’s technologies then, BANG!, undercut them at the bottom with me-too clones.

Wonder how HTC got so good at making handsets pretty much overnight? Hmmm… That’s Chinese ingenuity – cloning great products.

14 duckie { 02.20.11 at 4:21 am }

@relativity Sadly your conspiracy theories are unsupported by your poor grasp of reality. HTC did not become expert at making devices “overnight”. They’ve been at it for a decade, going back several versions of Windows Mobile – their design and build with mobile networks’ branding. And their build quality is still as low quality as ever, which I’ve experienced with many generations of their products. I’ve just evaluated the HD7 (Windows Phone – don’t get me started on the software we’ll be here all day!) and the faults were legion, from screen fritzing to rattling buttons. And this is a phone with a price tag only £100 under an iPhone 4. So much for “Chinese” (Taiwanese actually) “cloning ingenuity”.

15 mikeg { 02.20.11 at 6:12 am }

An excellent article as usual. I like the side-by-side comparison as captured with the slides as a good deal of content is able to be presented this way. I’d recommend doing more articles in this format where it is practical to convey the information in that fashion, particularly if saving time means more articles.

16 gatorguy { 02.20.11 at 6:17 am }

A simple analogy, which some here might be old enough to remember while others have studied it in business school. (I know Dan loves analogies to make his points. Butt PlayforSure=Android? Really stretching it Dan)

Back in the mid-70′s, Sony can out with a hi-quality video playback format called Betamax, broadly endorsed by the movie and TV show producers and broadcasters. While not the first company to offer home video recording and playback devices, Sony’s effort was the the first one widely accepted by both consumers and media suppliers (app developers in essence). Excellent playback quality even with the first-gen models, cool features for the time. Betamax recorders were flying off shelves. Just two years later and the first consumer VHS models appeared on shelves. (Note: Both Betamax and VHS began development about the same time, similar to iOS and Android). Betamax had many advantages besides being the early leader with a proven track record and industry endorsement. There was little argument that Sony had the better color quality and both it’s playback and recording resolution was higher than anything VHS could offer. They included “bookmarks”, something VHS wasn’t capable of. Fast Forward and Rewind was faster and more controlled. Nearly every reviewer could agree that Betamax was by far the better quality and more professional standard. Yet VHS came out the winner. Makes no sense, right?

Like Android, JVC had to play catchup. Sony was perceived by almost anyone who mattered as technologically superior. Sony was a behemoth in the marketplace and brilliant at marketing. People wanted a Betamax recorder. But Sony misread the market. They felt there was little need to compromise on pricing, nor to share their platform with whoever else would like to build one. They had the better device and felt consumers should and would be willing to pay more to get it. Betamax and Sony were synonymous with quality and cool, the “gotta have it” product. So JVC did something that was criticized at the time as a poor questionable business decision. They not only declined to support Sony’s industry standard, they offered cheap licensing agreements to anyone that wanted to build VHS models. Rather than take Sony on all by itself, dozens of electronics factories began rolling out models of their own, and often for hundreds of dollars less than Sony. While consumers thought Betamax was better and the one they wanted, VHS was the one they could afford. With multiple VHS developers working on the platform, features were improved and new one’s added. The marketplace forced quality to get both better and cheaper. Betamax became an afterthought for all but professional users. Apple is following this same script on so many levels. That’s no evidence the same eventual results, no more than Dan’s anologies are proof the same will happen to Android. But the video wars of the 70′s and 80′s are eerily similar to today’s mobile wars, and should be one of the easiest to understand, even by Apple fans.

17 The Mad Hatter { 02.20.11 at 6:48 am }

Yeah, and you could have added a third column for WebOS.

When Android first came out I had a argument with some people. My point was that Android used Linux, but it wasn’t Linux. My argument was less than popular.

Move forward to today, and most of them agree, begrudgingly. And most of them have noticed that WebOS is the same thing.

I like the GPL myself. It’s a wonderful example of North American communitism, the sort of spirit that built schools and town buildings all over this continent. My ancestors helped build schools, churches, and the town hall. But the Linux kernel is using the older version of the GPL, which allows Google to produce a closed device on top of an open kernel. This isn’t right, and the kernel needs to move to GPL V3 or later.

The idea of the kernel moving to GPL V3 or later terrifies hand set manufacturers. When I pointed out to one that he could just use a BSD kernel like Apple, he admitted that doing so would be more work, and that he’d rather avoid doing the work.

18 duckie { 02.20.11 at 7:00 am }

@gatorguy
Yes, that’s “easy to understand” if you just (a) leave out some of the facts and (b) assume that there is only one possible answer to why Betamax lost.

Initially VHS players were about the same price as Betamax, so not more affordable. Sony did in fact licence the technology to other manufacturers such as Toshiba and Pioneer. Longer tape running times (Betamax initially being only an hour) may have been a big contributory factor to the success of VHS, as may have been the lack of Betamax support for Macrovision and more movies on VHS for rent or purchase, as well as the much higher cost of Betamax tapes.

That’s the trouble with analogies, the world is rarely simple enough for them to work.

19 nextguy { 02.20.11 at 7:11 am }

“But the Linux kernel is using the older version of the GPL, which allows Google to produce a closed device on top of an open kernel. This isn’t right, and the kernel needs to move to GPL V3 or later.”

Has nothing to do with GPL v2 or or 3. You can build anything on top of a kernel that is closed source. You just have to let the kernel you used be available to others as well. Besides, Linus Torvalds isn’t a FSF nut, and is more pragmatic than most.

Perhaps you are thinking of BSD; they don’t care if you take it and close source it ever.

20 gatorguy { 02.20.11 at 7:24 am }

there’s several reason Betmax may have lost. But pricing is a primary reason. Not sure why you choose to revise history and claim it wasn’t a fact that while people may thought they wanted Betamax, they could better afford VHS. The hardware was certainly cheaper for the consumer (fact), media prices were less (fact) and market forces eventually gave them more features (fact). Sony was the only perceived manufacturer of Betamax (opinion), which was not widely licensed and too expensive (fact). Betamax had it’s fanboys who broadly proclaimed Sony’s standard as the only legitimate choice (fact). Sony attempted to hold pricing high (fact) while “lesser” VHS models were rolling out cheaper and by the dozens (fact). As the volume of VHS model began swamping Betamax sales (fact) the movie studios began to put more emphasis on getting VHS titles out first (fact) with Betamax titles often sometime later (fact). this lead to even faster VHS uptake and their eventual win in Video Wars (fact).

Again, that’s does not mean that Apple is following the same strategy, nor if they did that the results would be the same. So we agree that analogies might not be a very good way to evidence one’s point then?

21 nealC { 02.20.11 at 8:45 am }

@gatorguy: I happen to be old enough to remember when VCR’s first came out. I knew relatives that had Betamax machines as well as VHS machines at first. The MAIN reason, and ONLY reason people bought VHS over Beta was the long run times. You could lower the quality, but squeeze up to 6 hrs on one cheap tape. That was the killer feature that Beta couldn’t do.

The iPhone comparison is disingenuous. The iPhone HAS the killer features. There isn’t that one feature that Android has that is killer over iOS. Even if all Android phones were free, the delta cost over the life of the contract is small.

I believe that there is little to keep people in one camp vs the other. It is easy to switch every 2 years. So whatever phone and OS has the value proposition for the individual person will win.

Personally, when I go to a doctor, I want him to say “The best course of action is X. Y and Z are equal, but I prefer X”, and not “Well, you can choose, X, Y, or Z…they are all equal. So you choose whatever you want.” In the above example, I am placing value on the education of the Dr. to suggest the best choice. This is what people do when they buy iOS. If you don’t like the curated eco-system, don’t buy it.

22 gctwnl { 02.20.11 at 9:57 am }

@gatorguy
First, the video standards race was a thee horse race (though in the US, nobody knows the third horse: Video 2000 from Philips, which was considered in a few ways technologically superior to Betamax and VHS). Video 2000 never reached the US because Philips US (who had to be independent from Philips headquarters because they were also a US defense contractor) refused to market Philips’ own product. Instead they chose VHS as Philips’ most important competitor was Sony (they wanted not so much VHS to win, but they wanted Sony to lose). It was one of the reasons Philips got into enormous problems later (which they survived).

But the main reason VHS one was the rental industry. Movies on Betamax required often two tapes, while the same movie would fit on one VHS tape. So, Video rental stores (which were very important in those days) preferred to stock the VHS versions which were for them a lot more profitable (less inventory, storage space, etc.). Besides, also VCR’s were often rented (as they were very expensive initially) and VHS was cheaper for the rental industry. Slowly, Betamax disappeared from the rental industry and people wanting to buy a Video recorder opted for the one with the most available titles.

Now replace Video title with App and you see that there is another way to look at the forces in this competition.

23 harrywolf { 02.20.11 at 11:16 am }

Most of the posts here dont see beyond their own ego likes and dislikes, which is missing the point.
Its not about Apple or Google, or the f’n phone you happen to ‘like’.

Its about the delusion of choice, the nonsense of democracy, the insanity of advertising, the inability of most humans to see beyond themselves and their tight little closed self. ( there is analogy here, be careful)

Daniel is one of a a long line of clear thinkers, mostly unsung.

He is trying to tell you that what you hear, see and read in the mainstream media is not actually based on reality.
Thats why he gets political.

Believe it or not, you can apply Dilger-like analysis to any subject.
Try it.

There are allegedly closed and allegedly open systems everywhere….

24 gatorguy { 02.20.11 at 12:00 pm }

Correct, Harrywolf. We have little true choice left. Most of the differences between Republican and Democrat are an illusion. Neither as a whole really cares about you or me as an individual over their own personal wants. The idea that most of the world’s population has any real control over their path and position in life still another, more illusion. That most people can see beyond what they want to see? Still more illusion. Yes, in many ways Daniel is a clear thinker from what I’ve read and been told. If fact many of us are in certain aspects of our lives. But other ways his writing is meant to spin more illusions IMHO. Really little different from many others that need to tell us the truth as they see it. If we don’t agree, then the only explanation for them is we must just be too stupid to get it. The idea that their truth may not be everyone’s, or that what they believe may not be the clear common sense view that they are convinced it is? Incomprensible. Ridicule for what you don’t agree with is often evidence of a small mind, unwilling to acknowledge or learn from those they’ve already decided are unworthy. Most of us probably believe we strive to avoid that way of thinking, but too many of us fail.

25 gatorguy { 02.20.11 at 12:25 pm }

@Neal. The longer playing time was not the only reason no matter how much you would like it to be true. In fact it wasn’t even a tiny part of my purchasing decision. I bought VHS because I couldn’t afford Betamax. I saw my first one while in my early 20′s. I practically lived in electronics and record stores then. I wanted that $1300 (as I recall) Betamax so bad. Looked at them every time I went in, which was at least two or three times a month. It was probably 78 or 79 before I finally bought a video player. . . VHS, about $400. Tho I really wanted a Betamax, had read all the magazines that extolled their virtues, all the specs that made VHS inferior. Would I have bought Betamax at the time had I been able to afford it. I’m positive I would have. For some people, a home (which I was saving for), education expenses (Sociology then. Business later), or saving for the future may be more important than whether you paid extra to get the “cool one”. To convince yourself that platforms other than Apples couldn’t be preferable based on features is one of the issues that plague Apple fans. Yes, a lot of nice stuff with Apple. A few things that Android could benefit from. Apple could use Android’s voice control. Android’s physical keyboard. Android’s excellent free navigation (which was my biggest reason to go with them, keyboard secondary). there’s probably more than a few Apple owners waiting for those features to arrive on their platform.

26 nextguy { 02.20.11 at 2:49 pm }

“Daniel is one of a a long line of clear thinkers, mostly unsung.
He is trying to tell you that what you hear, see and read in the mainstream media is not actually based on reality.
Thats why he gets political.”

There are plenty of stupid things said on both sides, politically and in the smart phone space.

I mean, come on, his slides are right, iff we sat down and accepted his definitions of what “open” vs. “closed” meant, or what he thinks is “acceptable” or not.

But while I won’t assume that DED advocates the democratic party because he rightfully points out the stupidity of the republicans (which I think is due to stupidity and being intentionally evil), to claim they are any better isn’t clear rational thinking either.

27 dunpool { 02.20.11 at 4:14 pm }

@mike:
About App Store policies and approving apps: try submitting something to Amazons Android store and see your app getting rejected for displaying the URL of your own website. I had several problems with Apple but in the past few years Apple basicly stopped rejecting anything.

28 nextguy { 02.20.11 at 6:51 pm }

@dunpool, is that Amazon’s Android store, or each individually?

It is nice to hear about apple relaxing their policies, but what people complain most about them isn’t so much the policies but their consistency on them.

29 counterproductive { 02.21.11 at 10:51 am }

@gatorguy,
“Apple is following this same script on so many levels. That’s no evidence the same eventual results, no more than Dan’s anologies are proof the same will happen to Android. But the video wars of the 70’s and 80’s are eerily similar to today’s mobile wars, and should be one of the easiest to understand, even by Apple fans.”

I think you are a looking at “mobile wars” in a much more narrow way than is necessary. (see recent article at asymco.com about mobile platforms). Mobile phones are the TV’s, not the video cassette recorders. Apple TVs, Apple’s hobby, are the Betamax players at this point.

The TV Market is huge (everyone has one, or two). They range from 2″ to 72″. There are hundreds of manufacturers. There are flat screens and TVs with tubes. There are digital TVs and analog TVs (feature phones and smart phones?). Apple need only have the market that Sony has in TVs, and it will continue to get along just fine.

In short, there is lots of room for innovation and lots of room for multiple manufacturers.

I know you are trying to paint a picture that compares proprietary iOS apps as something that could go the way of the dodo just like Betamax did, and portray an investment in iOS apps as something very foolish. You might see investment in Android apps as something wiser, because one may choose from many other Android phones if one gets disgusted with their current Android phone. I wonder, is that any guarantee?

We don’t think iOS is going anywhere. This is why Dan’s reference to Plays-for-Sure is apt: anyone investing in media for that platform did have the rug pulled out from under them. MS took down the servers that verified the DRM for those purchases.

Apple has shown a lot of consistency and longevity in its platforms, as well as legacy support — while at the same time being able to re-invent them, move them forward or port them to other architectures. Apple’s platforms will continue to make the next leap, and the next, long after other platforms fade away.

30 Imapolicecar { 02.21.11 at 11:05 am }

nealC { 02.20.11 at 8:45 am }
“@gatorguy: I happen to be old enough to remember when VCR’s first came out. I knew relatives that had Betamax machines as well as VHS machines at first.”

I suspect you don’t know when the first machines came out really only the ones sold to the public. The machines you are talking about are the late 70s and early 80s. VCRs came out 20 years earlier than these!!

Otherwise @ Daniel – very funny article. Some nice twists in the tale!

31 gatorguy { 02.21.11 at 11:18 am }

Counterproductive: I completely agree that trying to draw an analogy between the current situation and the old video wars isn’t the most effective way to prove one’s point. I said as much a few posts back. I’m not, nor did I, try to paint Apple with same Betamax brush and I clearly wrote. Instead my point was to highlight the silliness of using metaphors and analogies as validation for one’s point of view by posting one that, one the surface, looked completely comparable. Yet still a lot of posts attempting to find fault with Android by comparing some other failure at some other place in time. I’d say my post was a success at drawing attention to flawed reasoning.

32 gatorguy { 02.21.11 at 11:22 am }

@Imapolicecar: Nope. Had no idea VHS-standard machines came out in the 50′s. Appreciate the factual correction. Could you point me to the source for that?

33 gatorguy { 02.21.11 at 11:25 am }

@Counterproductive: Sentence should read “I’m not, nor did I try, painting Apple with same Betamax brush and I clearly wrote as much”.

LOL. Sorry!

34 GQB { 02.21.11 at 11:35 am }

While I gave absolutely nothing other tha gut instinct to support this, I’d put money on the theory that VHS won because porn reproduction facilities standardized on it.

35 gatorguy { 02.21.11 at 11:51 am }

GQB, I’m sure you have more than a “gut instinct” to go by on that one. Lots of sources have (unsuccessfully) attempted to make that the primary reason for the VHS-standard win. Lots of reasons have been given, and it was a case-study in several business programs. Probably better to comment on Apple and Android, the subject of Dan’s slideshow, rather than Betamax/VHS. (Again) Analogies aren’t valid substitutes for facts as shown by the last several posts.

By the way Dan, very appreciative of your efforts to encourage civil discussion and thought. Your site is much more open to contrary opinions than I was lead to believe. While I can (and do) disagree with your methods of “proving” your point, the opportunity to have a lively back and forth on competing platforms isn’t terribly common at Apple-centric blog sites. Usually sinks into name-calling and angry illogical posts.

36 counterproductive { 02.21.11 at 12:03 pm }

“@Counterproductive: Sentence should read “I’m not, nor did I try, painting Apple with same Betamax brush and I clearly wrote as much”.

Yes, the middle sentence in the concluding sentences of yours that I quoted shows that you don’t want to make a grand pronouncement on the end game for iOS, nor that you want to accept pronouncements for Android. That was like your disclaimer.

However, I don’t think this:
“Instead my point was to highlight the silliness of using metaphors and analogies as validation for one’s point of view by posting one that, one the surface, looked completely comparable.”
…was at all clear from your original Betamax post.

I’ll repeat your three concluding sentences once again:
“Apple is following this same script on so many levels. That’s no evidence the same eventual results, no more than Dan’s anologies are proof the same will happen to Android. But the video wars of the 70’s and 80’s are eerily similar to today’s mobile wars, and should be one of the easiest to understand, even by Apple fans.”

Apple –> script
Possibly different outcome?
video wars –> mobile wars

Seemed pretty clear that you brought up the whole VHS / Betamax story to paint a picture of Android and iOS.

37 HCE { 02.21.11 at 12:17 pm }

Late to the party but here’s my 2 cents :-)

Frankly, I think that all this talk of “openness” and “freedom” is nonsense. Unless you are one of the extremely rare people who has both the necessary skills and inclination to start mucking with the OS on your phone, the fact that Android is open source will have no effect on you whatsoever. For the most part, the “freedom” and “openness” offered by Android benefits the device manufacturers and carriers – not the end users.

For my money, the only advantage offered by Android is choice – both in terms of hardware as well as in carriers. Of course, it could be argued that that this is a result of the freedoms granted by Android but I don’t think that’s quite correct. Windows Phone 7 could, in theory, give you the same amount of choice and it is as proprietary as they come. In fact, one could argue that Android’s openness makes it more vulnerable to fragmentation than any other platform.

– HCE

38 gatorguy { 02.21.11 at 12:32 pm }

Absolutely correct. I expected the post to be interpreted the way you and others did. Had I not posted the Betamax story, then mentioned Apple, then who here would have gone out of their way to disprove analogies leading to a conclusion. My intent exactly; to draw attention to them as fallacy. They can’t be logically construed as proof of anything, even if you THINK they do.

39 gatorguy { 02.21.11 at 1:01 pm }

@HCE. Agreed that anyone who argues that openness and freedom are what separates iOS from Android is attempting a foolish distinction. The biggest advantage is choice. You want a 4.3″ display? They have ‘em. A physical keyboard? Several. Voice input? You got it. Prefer T-Mobile over Verizon? No problem. Perhaps a Pre-paid phone? Yes again. IMHO, choice is what separates the two.

[There's certainly nothing wrong with choice, and trying new things is how society and genes evolve. Apple selects all sorts of things that have been speculatively developed, such as 1.8" hard drives, and turns them into products like the iPod.

But what you seem to miss is that while Android is being used by companies that try lots of things, it's not really demonstrating many good ideas. It tries to be all things to all people, but really the most successful android handsets are ones that look the most like the iPhone, and they're increasingly looking more and more like Apple products, not the other way around.

I'm all for trying new things and cross pollination, but your arguments about choice are lost when you seem to advocate that the only way we can really have choice is if we choose Android and give up all the unique things Apple offers (usability, viable app markets, media integration, and so much more).

You seem aware of some minority appeal in Android choices (like TMobile, or chicket keyboards) without acknowledging that all choices have consequences. Embracing all carriers from day one means Android offers much less actual freedom for users (you can't even update your phone when a new OS release comes out; you have to wait for 3-6 months, if ever; and with input, your apps are forced to assume you have a keyboard, even if the phone you chose lacks one.)

That all makes it hard to follow why you keep banging you ideological drum when you don't seem to have any rhythm and don't even like making interesting music, but instead just seem to worry that someone might like to listen to something else for a change. - Dan ]

On the very stable and reliable iPhone and iPad you’ve decided to let Apple make the choices for you, in hardware, software and applications. Nothing at all wrong with that either. With but one update cycle per year, I do expect useful new features and functions will probably come to Android faster, but then again no assurance that they’ll work properly. In my area of expertise it’s similar to Garmin and TomTom. One, TomTom, has traditionally been the first to market with new functions and has been much more customizable (hackable), being Linux-based. The other, Garmin, has a propietary OS, and takes it’s time testing as tweaking features bef9re offering them. TomTom’s buggy, with software updates that may fix one thing yet break another. Garmin is much more stable, and tho not perfect, much more likely to appeal to someone that wants a GPS that just works.

40 gus2000 { 02.21.11 at 1:12 pm }

Ask any teenager why VHS won, and you’ll get the same reply: “What’s VHS?”

This, of course, means that 20 years from now, no one will remember that crazy “Android” fad.

41 gatorguy { 02.21.11 at 1:29 pm }

Heck, who remembers Lisa or Newton either. Neither iOS nor Android is likely to exist as more than a moment in history 20 years on.

42 counterproductive { 02.21.11 at 1:51 pm }

Aaahhh, pretty wily gatorguy. But I already agree with you: analogies don’t logically prove something.

Good thing that they have their place, though. Such as, shedding light on something that is otherwise misunderstood. They sure can be helpful, *as far as they go*…

Such as, when Dan asks a question like, “does Apple deserve 30% 0f subscriptions?” And some people are like, “they are only processing payments”; or, “they don’t even host the media being purchased.” But some bright spark is like, “well, think of it this way…it’s a bit *like* a store renting space in a mall…” And we’re like, “oh, yeah, that’s a pretty good *analogy*; that helps show there is a little more to it — Apple is driving new business to these vendors.”

But then, you’re like, “…but the customer *bought* the table, so the vendor gets to tell the mall where to stick it.” And we’re like, “what…?”

I just feel like you are pretty bad at analogies all round. But don’t sweat it, there are worse things to be bad at.

43 berult { 02.21.11 at 2:45 pm }

gatorguy, if there were a Land ruled by fallacious arguments, you’d be the Emperor for life:
“…On the very stable and reliable iPhone and iPad you’ve decided to let Apple make the choices for you, in hardware, software and applications…”

I’ve been buying Apple tool kits for the past twenty years and I’ve never bought into them for their custom fit related to my needs. Being smart and all, I took to them for their out-of-the-box universal appeal to my intelligence.

I always felt, and still do after all these years, that Apple has inside knowledge of how minds work best and that its products, within the perimeters of current technology, embody that intimate knowledge into making it a natural extension of my DNA. Apple does great with the limited knowledge they have of human frailty.

Please, don’t downgrade what your logic has no wish to comprehend…!

44 gatorguy { 02.21.11 at 2:54 pm }

Why would think what I wrote was meant as a complaint? Not what I said so no need to be defensive.
@ counterproductive : You lost me on the mall and table thing. You’ve confused me with someone else

45 berult { 02.21.11 at 3:17 pm }

gatorguy, your problem seams to be that your right hand doesn’t know what your left hand’s writing about. Come on, shake hands and make up…!

46 gatorguy { 02.21.11 at 5:03 pm }

Now you’ve confused me. I thought you did trust Apple to make the right hardware and software choices for you. Instead you’ve taken that as a bad thing. Either that or you’ve chosen to read more into my posts than was written

47 nextguy { 02.21.11 at 6:06 pm }

” Ask any teenager why VHS won, and you’ll get the same reply: “What’s VHS?”

This, of course, means that 20 years from now, no one will remember that crazy “Android” fad.”

You think any teenager knows what an apple “2″ is? Startac? 2600?

:)

48 HCE { 02.21.11 at 11:21 pm }

@Dan

> I’m all for trying new things and cross pollination, but your
> arguments about choice are lost when you seem to advocate that
> the only way we can really have choice is if we choose Android

Actually, if Windows Phone 7 ever takes off, we’ll probably have just as much choice with WP7 as with Android.

> you can’t even update your phone when a new OS release comes
> out; you have to wait for 3-6 months, if ever

Funnily, for all of Android’s “freedoms”, you might be able to update your phone more frequently with WP7 than with Android :-) – thanks to Microsoft exerting some degree of control over the platform. Google’s relinquishing control over Android just means that the device manufacturers and carriers take control. In the end, the user isn’t any better off than he was with a proprietary platform.

However, that said, choice is good. I see nothing in any of the Android devices that appeals to me enough to want to switch but who knows, maybe down the line I might find something there that I am willing to give up my iPhone for.

– HCE

49 gatorguy { 02.22.11 at 6:46 am }

[Quote Dan: I'm all for trying new things and cross pollination, but your arguments about choice are lost when you seem to advocate that the only way we can really have choice is if we choose Android and give up all the unique things Apple offers (usability, viable app markets, media integration, and so much more). ]

Dan, as you’ve been prone to do, when you attempt to refute statements I’ve written, yet unable to, you resort to pushing them to a black or white extreme. Your topic is iOS vs. Android, not mine. I think we all acknowledge there’s other choices, HP and MS immediately coming to mind. However, nowhere have I rejected Apple products as a consumer choice. I’ve completely avoided any denigration of Apple features or products, in fact have given a “tip of the hat” to their well-developed, reliable ecosystem. In return you’ve attempted to, in effect, put words in my mouth and imply that I’ve said Android is the better choice between the two.

Oddly I haven’t seen a single instance where you’ve successfully refuted any comment I’ve actually made. You’ve made up a few (I point to a source of Android fragmentation statistics. You write “Why do you keep arguing that fragmentation doesn’t exist for Android and that handset sales somehow make Android a bigger, more important platform than iOS). You change the subject (I write “So do I feel confident that Android can deliver another 100 million potential customers to publishers, booksellers, the music industry and many more this year? Yes I do.” with no mention of tablets at all, to which you reply “Where is the evidence that tablets represent a huge market that Apple can’t service? “). Then at other times you’ve replied to my posts posts by simply diving into insults, namecalling and misdirection. (You: “Unless you can present examples of what you are accusing me of, you’re no better than that Tea Party morons like Sarah Palin who talk a lot of smack but have nothing to back it up.” Or this: “that’s because you’re not very smart.” or my personal fav: “That just makes you big mouthed asshat.”

If I’ve stated something factually incorrect, please correct me. I’ve kept the majority of my comments to Android, highlighting that things for that platform as not as doom and gloom as readers might gather from reading your blogs. At the same time I’ve avoided extending those same types of claims to Apple and their products. That’s appears to have frustrated you to the point that you’ve reduced most of you counter-points to the flawed responses I’ve referenced. Rather than play the part of Don Quixote flailing at windmills, if you have facts to dispute my Android posts, please post ‘em.

I feel BOTH iOS and Android (and WP7 and HP Pre) have compelling features and products that appeal to different consumers. Why would that bother you, prompting you to assume every positive Android mention must necessarily be an insult to Apple? Does Android detract from iOS to the point that you perceive them as a threat? Even Microsoft’s WP7 is suddenly getting grudging props from you, seemingly in hopes that “divide and conquer” might work to slow down Androids market advance. The enemy of my enemy is my friend no doubt. In any case, I only began posting here because Android was being put in an unflattering and, in my opinion, inaccurate light. To support one doesn’t require that you belittle the other does it?

50 gatorguy { 02.22.11 at 8:33 am }

Postscript: I wanted to be clear about one thing Dan: I have the utmost respect for you as an analyst of all things Apple. You appear to have great sources, reliable information on upcoming features and the trust of thousands of Apple users. Many of your predictions on the Apple market and upcoming changes have been spot on. Absolutely don’t dispute that. My quibbles are with the way Android is approached as a subject on the site as a whole. If I needed “Apples point of view” on a subject, you’d be one of my first choices. I just don’t find your viewpoints on Android to be either fair or accurate.

51 gatorguy { 02.22.11 at 8:34 am }

Postscript: I wanted to be clear about one thing Dan: I have the utmost respect for you as an analyst of all things Apple. You appear to have great sources, reliable information on upcoming features and the trust of thousands of Apple users. Many of your predictions on the Apple market and upcoming changes have been spot on. Absolutely don’t dispute that. My quibbles are with the way Android is approached as a subject on the site as a whole. If I needed “Apples point of view” on a subject, you’d be one of my first choices. I just don’t find your viewpoints on Android to be either objective or accurate.

52 gatorguy { 02.22.11 at 10:00 am }

Apologies, inadvertant double post. What can I say? It was sent from a PC. :)

53 Howard { 02.23.11 at 11:10 am }

Quite simply … Brilliant.

54 Andre Richards { 02.25.11 at 1:18 pm }

You know what the most bizarre things about Android users/Google fans is? Most of them seem to think “open source” means free services. Try talking to some of them and you’ll soon discover that a lot of the geek cred these guys are assumed to have is bogus. Most of them are just know-nothing fans of all-things-Google and have no idea what the concept of open source actually means. I debated this once with a guy who kept insisting that Apple was closed and Google was open and his proof? The fact that he wasn’t charged a dime to use any of Google’s services. I tried to explain to him that Apple was actually a very active contributor to the open source community and that, in fact, Google’s browser was powered by Apple’s open source Webkit and he simply could not grasp what I meant.

Anyway, try it sometime and see what I’m talking about. For a lot of these Google fans, open source = free services, and that’s the real extent of their knowledge when it comes to that entire topic.

55 androidlover { 02.26.11 at 9:14 pm }

lol all your points are wrong, come out of the apple bubble and learn to get opposite perspectives, impossible for an apple fan I presume(tongue firmly in cheek)
1) Android market is proprietary, android OS is not, android OS is fully open source and I hope you realize the significance of open source, iOS is based on an open source operating system unix. Apple struggled with their own in-house OS and they only thrived when they changed over to unix. Google has never said, android market is open source

[Trying to grasp the point you think you are making. I made it very clear that Android only has some Open Source components. Most of the value is not open. Not Google's apps, not most third party apps, and not most phones themselves. So there's really no "open" advantage for users, only system integrators who want to customize (and fractionalize) Android code as a platform. As I pointed out (and as you seem to be strawman arguing with me, Apple has also leveraged open source BSD to bring the iPhone to market quickly, but as is the case with Google's use of Linux, this is largely irrelevant to users, and certainly does not make either product an "open" phone.

You chastise me for being unable to learn the "opposite perspective," then argue the same thing I just said. That's an indication you don't really understand the fairly obvious picture I drew for you. I find this bizarre. ]

2) App market mediocrity, that discussion is so 2010, this is 2011, I would advise you to browse market.android.com and see how it blows aways the crummy Itunes with its stupid legacy ties to PC. And as for market sales, I would expect it to improve this year, around 40 percent of android handsets were sold in q4 2010, it needs time dude, it is not magic.

[Are you joking? It's 2011 and Android Market is a laughingstock full of ringtone and wallpaper apps. Nobody is buying software from Android. Despite having those leading sales" in 2010, Google was behind RIM and Nokia in app store revenue, and about a tenth of what Apple was doing. That is to say, completely irrelevant. Apple built its app business since mid 2008, so it's not like Apple has some vast lead. It's just doing a vastly better job.]

3) android OS is littered with adware? I have nexus S, I don’t see any ads when I am making a call, I only see ads with free apps. I presume you like the emotional appeal of iAds because it is magical and different(and has the i alphabet) ? and no OS has not crashed even once. Maybe you tested out with a low end android smartphone. You get what you pay for.

[Adware pertains to the software platform, not the core OS. Not yet at least. I wouldn't put it past Google to start popping up ads while you make calls. You paid an iPhone 4 price for a plastic phone running old software that is not likely to be updated within 3-6 months of Google's releases. ]

4) needless criticism of google logo, shows where your heart is(hate for any company that competes with Apple). A company is more than its logo, heck google changes its logo a lot.

[I don't hate Google, I'm just disappointed that they do such a poor job at things they obviously aren't any good at, instead of working to figure out how to do those things correctly first, as Apple has done in entering completely new markets (like iAd, or smartphones, or music players, or web browsers, or tablets. Look at the amateur job Google is doing everywhere. Sloppy and embarrassing. ]

5) yes users need to make decisions, over time, this is more scalable than on relying on a few hundred overworked censor employees in Apple who have their own biases and who are presumably human, so they are going to make mistakes and apple users have no way of knowing that the app they have downloaded from apple appstore is riddled with bad intentions.

[I guess "I love spyware and adware and worms and viruses" is also an acceptable defense for Google's failure in Android Market.]

6) Yes Google gave away free OS to compete with APple. Instead Google should not have competed with Apple and let Apple dominate Platforms and slowly exclude google(remember Google voice blocking in 2009)

[I don't really write about what I think "should" have happened, because my opinion is worth about as much as yours. I write about what is happening. Because people like you refuse to see that personal, ideologically driven goals are not reality. That makes what I write worth more than what you write, because it's not just my opinion. ]

7) Nokia is a dead company, it does not matter what they do, most of their sales are in India and China and they are moving away from Symbian, I am not sure if WP7 will sell all that well in price conscious India and China.

[Most of their sales are not going toward WP7, they're acting as the world's cheap feature phone. Which "price conscious" buyers are likely to want more than a fragile smartphone that looks like an iPhone but has a dancing green robot associated with it.]

8) Android is going to enable 100 dollars or less smartphones in India and China and yes it is a bad thing that so many people are now going to get an equal footing with the wealthy western residents, somehow it is evil and megalomaniacal.
Finally as an android lover, I like the competition between android and iOS and this keeps both the companies honest and developer friendly. See how a google loving nerd is more broadminded than Apple loving apple fan. The next time you write, please do some proper analysis of Apple’s competitors and come out of the comfort zone.

[I fail to see how you are "broadminded" at all. You seem content with forming an opinion and calling everyone else names based on your idea of what you think "should happen." Sounds pretty ignorant to me. At least I back up what I say with figures and trends, rather than just decreeing what "everyone wants" based on my own personal fantasy - Dan ]

56 androidlover { 02.26.11 at 9:34 pm }

Andre Richards,
I find Apple fans are clueless when it comes to the definition of open source, open source means source is available for all. Open source does not mean open development, appstore for that OS should be open or that gatekeepers for the source code of that OS should come from more than one company. Those are all peripheral to the definition of open source. And Apple fans hardly know that iOS is based on Unix which is open source.
And webkit was not originally developed by Apple, it was derived from the KHTML foundation which Apple then forked.

[Wrong, WebKit was originally develop by Apple because Apple originated the WebKit project. WebCore is a fork of KHTML. WebCore is just the rendering engine, and wasn't that valuable. Nobody adopted Apple's work until it opened up the entire browser with WebKit. Clearly you are just bigoted and prejudiced against Apple because it's easier than understanding how things actually work.

It doesn't really matter to users that Apple uses, funds and participates in open source development, ranging from BSD to LLVM to CUPS to WebKit. The important part is that Apple doesn't make some grandiose statement about being "open and not evil" and then turn around and release proprietary software on a locked device. Android hype about openness is largely just hypocritical nonsense. The value of Android is not open. -Dan ]

57 androidlover { 02.26.11 at 10:46 pm }

you are taking objection to the hyperbole and marketing statements of Google I guess, I believe Apple also does it from time to time :), I am sorry you were offended by name calling. But I did give points against your observations.

Google might make poor software, but look at chrome and safari, both are freely available for windows, but it is chrome which is growing much faster than safari.

[Well I can't claim that Safari is great software, but Chrome is built from Apple's WebKit. So it's not like it competes with Safari. You might as well compare a VW to an Audi and say the VW sells better when, its based on an Audi frame and engine. Rather ludicrous comparison. ]

Not sure if android is doing an amateur job, if ANdroid is an amateur job, it is one heck of an amateur job with over 350K activations per day, I mean Apple should be positively happy that android is an amateur job, else its activations per day would have touched the stratosphere(1million per day perhaps)

[Those phones were already being sold before Android. They had Symbian or Windows Mobile on them or were proprietary LG with Flash Lite. The fact that they have Android on them now is meaningless. Google didn't invent a new market, it just pushed out free software based on stuff it took from its former partners. What Google has uniquely built is the amateur part: a platform that works about as well as Windows, a dysfunctional software store, ugly, poor quality buggy OS software, and shoddy support for standards, from CalDAV to HTML5 SVG. ]

you did not get my point regarding android market. Yes Android market sucked till now, but market.android.com the webbased android market is much better and this debuted in feb 2011 and the process of installing apps without wires is pretty nice.
you also did not get my point regarding installed base, apple iOS install base is much bigger than android, until the beginning of Q4, there were only 34 million android devices(5 million in Q1, 9 million in Q2, 20 million in Q3 as per IDC), but already more than a 100 million iOS devices were in circulation. It is only recently that android device activations is matching and vaulting over the total number of iOS device activations daily.

[But the store is still just mountains of ringtones and wallpapers pretending to be useful apps, augmented by stolen apps wrapped in malware. It's a junk market and you can't deny that. Having more Android handsets won't turn that around, just as having more Windows PCs didn't make the market for Windows software legitimate. Both are 60% piracy and 30% malware.]

Also android may not be fully open, but it is much more open than iOS, for eg, you say android market sucks, so others can take a shot at an improved android market say amazon or verizon or even start ups like appbrain. That is indeed open. And android OS is fully open source. That is significant. For the first time, an open source software is going to power hundreds of millions of consumer devices, the possibilities are endless, new business models could emerge washing the boring and old business model. And darwinian evolution will see to it that only strong business models survive/thrive. I did give an example that iOS is based on freeBSD. And hasn’t apple disrupted telcos ?

[There is nothing open in Google's VALUE layer in Android. Linux has already been widely used by Motorola in China. It wasn't really open, just openly exploited. The mobile world is being changed by Apple's innovation, not by phony-open software maintained by Google. Google is promoting proprietary standards it publishes (much like Microsoft publishing VC-1 and Office formats as "open") and the promotion of Adobe's proprietary Flash. That's the reverse of open.]

And when I said Apple appstore is also prone to bad apps, you just made some vague general statements, the fact is Apple app approvers are humans, so time and again they fail(humans fail more than machines at repetitive tasks, it is well documented), some rotten apps get through, and the apple users fully trusting Apple install apps thinking it is a good app properly tested. My point is apple appstore security policies is not scalable

[Sorry, that just isn't true. There haven't been report after report about malware/spyware in the App Store. The problem is off the hook in Android Market because its easy to steal an app, wrap it with malware, and put it back up with Google's blessing. That's only possible (and WIDESPREAD) on the jailbroken Cydia store, which is why Apple does not support sideloading. So no, you are wrong in assuming there is no difference. ]

And you have nothing to say about cheap smartphones mostly powered by android changing lives literally in India and China and other emerging countries.

[What hogwash. Nobody with a life that needs changing is doing so via a "cheap" smartphone in poor nations. The reality is that, while the press chats up Apple/Foxconn suicides, Google licensees employ illegal child labor, work in dangerous and abusive conditions, and are exploited by migrant worker traffickers. It's just that Google takes no action to change any of this, while Apple does. The companies that Apple rejects as unfit suppliers make Android phones. ]

Ultimately both companies are answerable to their shareholders and do their best to increase shareholder wealth, it is just that more users will benefit from android than from Apple in the long term.(my subjective opinion) and that is why I am an android lover.
iAds is a non-entity basically. Admob blows iAds out of the park.

[By what metric, the level of your fanitude? Check to see how great of a share of the mobile market Apple and Google have. Apple went from zero in ads to being tied with Google. You can't invent facts just like you invent your own opinion. ]

PS: when google says “do no evil”, they mean to the end-users, google exists to help end-users. If end-users stop trusting them, they will stop visiting google.com and they will lose business. That is all that it means, it is simple really.

[Except that Google fuels spammers via email, web site monetization and phony search results. I don't think spam is in users' interests. With Android, it clearly does not have users' interests in mind. It has created the world's most powerful malware/spyware platform, rivaling Windows by adding mobility into the mix, so rather than just having viruses on your PC, you now have all your personal data, calling records and SMS charges exposed to active malicious hacking, right in the Android Market. ]

And you say android is a monoculture and you despise that future, yet you are willing to live in a world where all the profits from software, hardware, ads , services go to one company ala Apple. That would be wonderful for consumers eh, with Apple at 2 trillion dollar market cap and the rest around zero and the developers living in fear of the apple overlords. I find that as bad as android monoculture you were alluding to.

[Worrying that world will fall to Apple is rather slippery slope nonsense, considering that it has 10% of PCs and 20% of smartphones. Google, on the other hand, controls +90% of all English web search and monopolizes the market for web advertising. They can make anyone disappear on the web. Your fears are clearly misplaced - Dan ]

58 gslusher { 03.01.11 at 12:33 am }

@gatorguy:

“there’s several reason Betmax may have lost. But pricing is a primary reason”

Funny, when I bought my first VCR (a Betamax by Toshiba), it was CHEAPER than any VHS VCR I could find at the time. That’s one reason that I got it. I later also bought a VHS VCR, primarily for 1) 6 hours vs 4 hours recording time and 2) movie rentals. It certainly wasn’t the price. I didn’t pay anything near $1300–more like $400-500.

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