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Myth 8: iPhone will lose out to Steve Ballmer’s Windows Mobile 7 in 2010

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Daniel Eran Dilger
Continuing upon the previous seven iPhone myths, this one insists that Apple will lose its iPhone platform to Microsoft’s Windows Mobile 7 as Steve Ballmer rears his head and comes into the airspace of Apple’s mobile platform. That’s wrong, here’s why.

iPhone Myths
Five More iPhone Myths
Myth 6: iPhone Developers will Flock to Android
Myth 7: iPhone Buyers will Flock to Android
Myth 8: iPhone will lose out to Steve Ballmer’s Windows Mobile 7 in 2010
Myth 9: iPhone Unable to Penetrate Europe Due to Symbian Dominance
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8. iPhone will lose out to Steve Ballmer’s Windows Mobile 7 in 2010

Microsoft’s CEO has promised that Apple’s early success with the iPhone is only temporary. Addressing the Churchill Club in Silicon Valley, Ballmer warned that Nokia, Research in Motion and Apple would all lose out as the market expands over the next five years, because they control their own proprietary software tied to their own hardware.

Speaking of Nokia’s 30% share of the smartphone market, Ballmer said, “If you want to reach more than that, you have to separate the hardware and software in the platform,” suggesting that the Windows PC software licensing model was the destiny for smartphones.

Never mind that Symbian software is already separate from Nokia’s hardware business; Symbian is currently a partnership between Nokia, Sony Ericsson, NTT DoCoMo, and a variety of others, and it will continue to remain an independent software platform even as Nokia takes it over and releases it as an open source software platform.

What Ballmer was trying to say is that the future for smartphones would not come from today’s leaders. Nokia happens to be at the top globally, while RIM and Apple lead in the US market. According to Ballmer, these all need to make way for Windows Mobile so that Microsoft can monopolize smartphones the same way that it monopolized PCs in the 90s. Rather than elucidating a genius strategy for making progress among mobile devices, Ballmer was simply decreeing that Microsoft would win because it wants to win.

Ballmer changes tune while dancing around Apple’s success
Symbian reports slow growth in front of iPhone 3G launch

Ballmer vs Ballmer.

Of course, Ballmer had also earlier told his own employees that Microsoft was seeking to copy Apple’s business model of integrated hardware and software so it too could offer “great end-to-end experiences” as Apple has with the Mac, iPod, and iPhone. The problem is that Microsoft can’t focus on doing both. The company’s recent experiences indicate that it can’t do either one:

  • It failed to take on the iPod with both the PlaysForSure software platform and its own integrated Zune hardware.
  • Windows Mobile has actually lost market share dramatically in the smartphone market, from 23% in 2004 to 12% today. It has no official plans for its own integrated phone.
  • Even PC sales are falling from Microsoft’s grasp, with Apple grabbing an increasingly large chunk of high growth laptop sales: 20% of retail US unit sales and a whopping 35% dollar share of that market now belong to Apple. Microsoft has no plans outlined for an integrated PC.
  • In video games, Microsoft has rapidly fallen from its early head start with the integrated Xbox 360. Conversely it has no plans to license the Xbox to commodity hardware partners.

Will the release of Windows Mobile 7 reverse Microsoft’s trend toward failure in the smartphone market? Certainly not before it can hit the shelves in 2010. Even then, it won’t have much to offer outside of catching up to iPhone 2.0, which will be a problem because by then Apple will likely be deep into its third major revision of iPhone software, with many months of $40 million in third party software sales under its belt and years of worldwide deployment of iPhones.

The Spectacular Failure of WinCE and Windows Mobile
Microsoft’s Zune, Vista, and Windows Mobile 7 Strategy vs the iPhone

Outlook Not So Good.

Over the next year, Apple is likely to distribute a billion mobile apps in a market that is growing even faster than the exponential growth in song sales Apple managed with iTunes. While observers expressed confidence in Microsoft’s ability to bring down iTunes with its consortium of PlaysForSure partners in 2004, the company’s miserable failure to even make a dent in iTunes sales has changed the opinion of those now considering whether Microsoft can catch up in mobile sales after entering the market years behind Apple.

Even Gartner, which has served as a cheerleader for all things Microsoft over the last two decades, is recommending mobile manufacturers side with Android or Symbian in a curious statement that makes no reference to Microsoft’s Windows Mobile at all. In February 2006, Garner was insisting that Nokia dump Symbian and adopt Windows Mobile if it wanted to be taken serious in the enterprise market.

“In the enterprise market, Nokia should expand its smartphone portfolio past Symbian to include Microsoft-based products. Nokia is in danger of making the same mistake again — trying to force end users to take its preferred solution rather than giving them what they want. In North America, enterprises will demand Microsoft-based products. Nokia should not discontinue Symbian devices, but it should focus Symbian products on the consumer and prosumer market, while offering Microsoft-based products to the enterprise market.”

Gartner says to Nokia : start making Windows Mobile phones
Will Windows Mobile Play DOS to Apple’s iPhone?

Windows Mobile is not Windows.

Microsoft’s rise to monopolize the PC market began when it was granted control of the software side of IBM’s PC in 1981. Microsoft leveraged IBM’s brand to vault MS-DOS as the real value of the PC, and was allowed to license that basic software to the PC-compatible competitors of IBM. It then forced Apple to sign a 1985 deal that licensed Mac technologies to Microsoft at no cost, enabling it to upgrade DOS PCs into Windows PCs at a time when Apple’s “look and feel” lawsuits helped to stifle competition on the PC, and as Microsoft’s own OEM licensing contracts forbade PC makers from assisting any competition to DOS or Windows from gaining a foothold.

Things are vastly different in the smartphone industry today. While Microsoft was able to leverage its brand to take an early lead among the impractical prototype smartphone market of 2003, its product simply wasn’t very good and didn’t progress fast enough to avoid being marginalized by faster moving competitors. Even Microsoft’s deal to replace the Palm OS with Windows Mobile on certain popular smartphones sold by Palm did little to shore up the market share of Windows Mobile.

When RIM’s BlackBerry entered the scene in the US market, it rapidly outpaced Windows Mobile sales. Other major smartphone manufacturers defended their home turf markets from entry by Windows Mobile, including Nokia and Sony Ericsson in Europe and Sharp and NTT DoCoMo in Japan. Microsoft has brokered deals with lots of smartphone manufacturers, including Sony Ericsson. Despite wide distribution, Windows Mobile phones haven’t remained very popular, as evidenced by Microsoft’s tumbling market share. The problem is that Windows Mobile just isn’t very good.

Office Wars 3 – How Microsoft Got Its Office Monopoly
Mac Office, $150 Million, and the Story Nobody Covered

Why Windows Mobile is So Very Rotten.

The desktop PC Windows wasn’t very good in 1990 either, but nobody offered a strong competitor that was ready to compete with it and broadly available. IBM’s OS/2 was technically superior as an operating system, but it lacked the graphical interface and the applications that were becoming available for Windows, in large part due to the fact that OS/2 cost a lot of money as a retail purchase (nearly $300) on top of the Windows license new PC users got “for free.” Windows never had any serious competition, so it never had to be a very good product.

Microsoft delivered an equally bad product for smartphones. The problem is that smartphones demand a better operating system than PCs do. Smartphones with a bad user interface, lethargic performance, security holes, crashing instability, and long boot times can’t be rationalized around with a Ctl Alt Del or fed RAM until they work acceptably. Symbian isn’t the greatest developer platform, but it does offer a solid operating system. The Palm OS offered a weak OS, but made up for that in part with a stronger user interface. RIM delivered specific strengths in messaging. Windows Mobile offered nothing but a placeholder product riddled with weaknesses.

When Apple released the iPhone with a stellar user interface and a strong operating system foundation, followed up by 2.0 features that included rapid development tools and stronger messaging features, the remains of Windows Mobile were blown out of the water. The deepest cut however came from the iPhone’s highly usable web browser, which immediately obsolesced the “Pocket Internet Explorer” offered by Windows Mobile.

Windows Mobile 7 plans to catch up to the iPhone with a better browser, a revamped and largely imitative user interface, and support for accelerometers and multitouch just like the iPhone offered in 2007. Microsoft’s version will ship in 2010, and it won’t do anything for existing Windows Mobile phones, few of which offer any hardware support for the new accelerometer and multitouch features. That means the market for Windows Mobile phones will continue to be rotten over the next year or so, and then start fresh from zero with a rewarmed platform that attempts to clone the iPhone.

Microsoft plans “Skymarket” apps store for Windows Mobile 7 in 2009

Windows Mobile vs Android, Symbian.

If Apple and Microsoft were the only two major platforms competing in the smartphone arena, we may have had the opportunity to observe another PlaysForSure vs iPod unfold. However, this time around Microsoft is also competing against two major alternatives: the soon to be open sourced Symbian and Google’s Android, both of which are gunning to be the next “DOS” for smartphones. Both have lined up as many credible partners as Microsoft. The main difference is that both lack a direct profit motivation.

Symbian is throwing in the towel on charging licensing fees for its software, and Android will be free right out of the gate. Manufacturers of both alliances will still be paying for the software indirectly by supporting that software development. That makes Symbian and Android closer to Apple’s integrated model of the iPhone, except that the former two will have hardware competition among their partners and will undoubtedly offer a greater variety of form factors than Apple will. On the other hand, Apple will have the only cohesive platform where the software and hardware are custom-designed to fit together, resulting in less effort to support all those variables on included features and differing form factors.

Apple will be unique in offering the differentiation of tight integration versus Android, Symbian, and Windows Mobile, while Windows Mobile will be unique in offering the only platform partners have to pay direct licensing fees to use. It will also be unique in offering a proprietary web browser. The other three will be pushing a WebKit based browser, meaning that the mobile world’s contributions will go into maintaining WebKit’s lead as the superior mobile browser engine. No wonder Microsoft hates open source.

Will Google’s Android Play DOS to Apple’s iPhone?
Google’s Android Platform Faces Five Tough Obstacles
Microsoft’s Unwinnable War on Linux and Open Source

iPhone vs Microsoft.

The damage caused to Microsoft by the iPhone will go far beyond Windows Mobile. If the world thought that the iPod delivered a halo effect over Mac sales, imagine what the iPhone will do over the next year. Unlike the iPods, the iPhone and iPod touch deliver a software platform based on Mac OS X’s Cocoa. Besides generating tens of millions in software revenues for third party mobile developers every month, the iPhone App Store will also direct loads of interest into the Mac software platform as well.

The impact on Mac sales is already clearly visible. As Apple ramps up iPhone sales internationally and builds out retail stores in the wake of its sales, Mac hardware will also force its way into the cracks of the Windows PC monopoly and expand to break open the computing landscape. Thanks to the web and a new push to create platform-agnostic web apps led in part by Google, the barriers imposed by Microsoft to stifle competition and technological progress are rapidly becoming irrelevant in desktop computing.

If HP, Dell, Acer and other top PC manufacturers were faced with Windows as their only alternative, there might be cause for concern that 2010 would usher in a push for Windows 7 that would return the PC world to the monoculture imposed by Windows 95. However, all of the top PC manufacturers are pushing back on Vista and investigating alternatives, with Acer pioneering Linux sales, Dell experimenting with Linux-based netbooks, and HP reportedly working to deliver its own OS, like a Linux variant. PC makers owe no loyalty to the company that has been taxing their performance with licensing fees. The only way they can compete for hardware sales is to differentiate themselves, something Windows 7 won’t help them do.

Similarly, Windows Mobile 7 will be too little, far too late. Google’s free Android replacement faces some of the same problems as Windows Mobile, but lacks the need to provide any direct commercial return on investment. What about Symbian? Will the iPhone be unable to penetrate Europe due to Symbian dominance? Myth 9 will investigate.

Myth 9: iPhone Unable to Penetrate Europe Due to Symbian Dominance
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27 comments

1 Myth 7: iPhone Buyers will Flock to Android — RoughlyDrafted Magazine { 10.05.08 at 10:10 pm }

[...] Myths Myth 6: iPhone Developers will Flock to Android Myth 7: iPhone Buyers will Flock to Android Myth 8: iPhone will lose out to Steve Ballmer’s Windows Mobile 7 in 2010. 7. iPhone buyers will flock to [...]

2 Myth 6: iPhone Developers will Flock to Android — RoughlyDrafted Magazine { 10.05.08 at 10:11 pm }

[...] Myths Myth 6: iPhone Developers will Flock to Android Myth 7: iPhone Buyers will Flock to Android Myth 8: iPhone will lose out to Steve Ballmer’s Windows Mobile 7 in 2010 . 6. iPhone developers will flock to [...]

3 Realtosh { 10.05.08 at 11:34 pm }

Simply brilliant analysis.

Thanks Dan.

4 Planeten Paultje { 10.06.08 at 2:15 am }

Ballmer sounds like the former Iraqi Minister of Information. And he likes his strategy ;-).

5 CCS { 10.06.08 at 3:48 am }

It will be interesting to see how Linux plays out on the desktop. I have many friends who are Linux users (Ubuntu, of course). With all the *nix/Linux based OSes out there, it seems there can be a new standard of cross-platform software support that doesn’t rely on totally different architectures (Windows vs. everything else). What would it be like to have a world without Windows?

Nokia seems to have stuck to their guns in providing phones that are just intuitive (in my experience). I still have my Nokia Series 40 phone (6230), and it’s still serving me well, although the AT&T coverage where I live (that is, my place of residence) is less than optimal.

Can’t wait to read the next myth busting article!

6 Joel { 10.06.08 at 5:19 am }

“With all the *nix/Linux based OSes out there, it seems there can be a new standard of cross-platform software support that doesn’t rely on totally different architectures (Windows vs. everything else). What would it be like to have a world without Windows?”

Unix and Linux have long had many cross-architecture standards that allow the sharing of software. And due to may applications being open source its easy to either re-compile for a new platform or have program ported over.

OS X is included with this since it shares the Unix standards. It also has a pre-installed Java environment so that Java-based applications can be shares as well. (It also have various programming environments built in which why I think its so popular with developers…)

Windows has been a huge step backwards since it portrays other platforms as inherently non-compatible when the truth is otherwise. Once you remove Windows from your work-flow its interesting how compatible everything is since you no-longer rely on Windows “standards”…

7 lowededwookie { 10.06.08 at 6:28 am }

While it’s nice to see that companies like Acer and HP are releasing Linux based desktops it’s just a shame that Acer sucks bumhole and HP has rapidly declined to the point where it is becoming the new Acer.

The company I work for are the official Acer desktop support for New Zealand and I can safely assure you that I will come to your house and ridicule you for being such a cheap bastard if you ever buy one.

With Linux it just means the cheap got cheaper and no value has been added to the machine. It will still crap out. Luckily for the customer it will always crap out under warranty. Unluckily for the customer it will crap out within a month of them buying it and that will incur a call to a Helpdesk which is full of people whose native language is nothing close to resembling English.

So glad Apple never skimped out on support like PC companies have.

8 lmasanti { 10.06.08 at 8:10 am }

quote:
“Microsoft has no plans outlined for an integrated PC.”

Isn’t Microsoft delivering the Surface?

9 lmasanti { 10.06.08 at 8:12 am }

It is time for Dan to write down a comparison between Ballmers’ RDF and Jobs’ RDF.

10 Albert { 10.06.08 at 1:00 pm }

“Windows Mobile 7 plans to catch up to the iPhone with a better browser, a revamped and largely imitative user interface, and support for accelerometers and multitouch just like the iPhone offered in 2007″.
I thought Multitouch is a patented technology by Apple and that’s why it is absent from Android. Wouldn’t it apply to MS as well?
IMHO, the only way for MS to deliver WINMO7 is to come up with a Zune phone, I just cannot see anyone paying licensing fees when every other mobile OS is, or will be, free.

11 John Muir { 10.06.08 at 2:05 pm }

@Imasanti

Ballmer’s RDF is hooked up backwards and only convinces him of what other people say.

12 John Muir { 10.06.08 at 2:10 pm }

@Joel

Correct. Although I’d add Flash as it’s a proprietary pain in the arse which Adobe will never get on the iPhone either. Sheesh: look how bad they make it on the Mac! I disable it in Safari.

13 GwMac { 10.06.08 at 2:50 pm }

First of all I have been a Mac user for 24 years now and have never owned a Windows PC in my life. However, I do own a Windows cellphone. It is the new HTC Diamond from Sprint. I also have an iPod touch, and although lacking some of the iPhone’s functionality, it is a good comparison. I have only used my Diamond a few weeks, but I can tell you I was very pleasantly surprised. So much so that my iPod touch is on ebay as I write this post. I had heard all the horror stories, but none turned out to be true. The TouchFlo interface makes me forget that I am even using WinMo at all. I also look the ability to change nearly every aspect I want and the flexibility that iPhone users can only dream of, at least without jailbreaking it. I originally got the Diamond for the simple fact that I want to stay with Sprint and hate AT&T. But now I have to admit that even if Sprint offered an iPhone I would still probably prefer my HTC Diamond.

Some specific examples include: Multimedia messaging, stereo Bluetooth, voice dialing, 3.2 megapixel camera with video recording, voice directed GPS, voice dialing, ability to play far more video codecs like Divx, replaceable battery, better email for multiple accounts, easy tethering and also broadcasting as a wifi hotspot are the main ones that come to mind. I also like the smaller size and higher resolution.

I am not trying to knock the iPhone since it has some great points as well. In my case, many of the missing features like MMS, voice dialing, and a few more are the ones I tend to use most of all. I am sure the next iPhone update will address many of these complaints, but WinMo is not nearly as bad as you say in this and other articles.

14 gus2000 { 10.06.08 at 4:59 pm }

“Isn’t Microsoft delivering the Surface?”

Yes, but that is not a portable device. However, inside sources tell me that Microsoft in 2011 will be delivering a Windows-7, touch-based tablet PC dubbed the “SubSurface”.

Watch out, Apple! You can’t touch this!

15 august { 10.06.08 at 5:18 pm }

@John

If you’re still willing to give Flash a go, you should try the Flash 10 beta. It definitely has much better performance. Still bad, but better than 9.

16 The Mad Hatter { 10.06.08 at 7:18 pm }

Those who control their own software will control their destiny. The problem with Windows Mobile is that you have to depend on Microsoft to deliver. If you use Android or Symbian, you can customize. If you are Palm, RIM, or Apple, you own your future.

17 rmenke { 10.06.08 at 7:45 pm }

Just a tiny correction: Nokia bought out its partners in Symbian before creating the Symbian Foundation and transferring control of the platform to them. The partnership was dissolved in June of this year.

18 danieleran { 10.06.08 at 8:58 pm }

Reader emailed a good comment:

“With regards to the separation of hardware and software that Microsoft likes to make, I’d like to point out that the computer science department of MIT is located in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. If MIT grounds computer science in electrical engineering then I think that Ballmer is basing his thoughts on some ephemeral delusion. Given that Mr. Jobs bases his machines in the assembling of components and software it seems he understands the integrity of the hardware and software that was the soul of historical computing. The rumored notion of the new Apple Brick factories further delights me, in that Apple will produce not just the software but will add the secret sauce of customized hardware to its assembly. Tell us about the Brick if you know any thing about it. Look forward to your next article
- Emaan”

19 Five More iPhone Myths — RoughlyDrafted Magazine { 10.07.08 at 12:15 am }

[...] Myths Myth 6: iPhone Developers will Flock to Android Myth 7: iPhone Buyers will Flock to Android Myth 8: iPhone will lose out to Steve Ballmer’s Windows Mobile 7 in 2010 Myth 9: iPhone Unable to Penetrate Europe Due to Symbian Dominance. 1. Verizon EVDO iPhone Just [...]

20 dobbie { 10.07.08 at 4:47 am }

Microsoft’s problem is Cost. The PC dominated the Mac largely because of commodification of PC parts pushing down costs drastically. More drastically than costs were cut for the less standardized Mac. (Also, the dofus non-Jobs management went for a too-high-margin strategy)

I really don’t see that kind of development in the mobile space – most manufacturers are using roughly the same components. And so, quality will dominate cost as a determining factor in the market.

21 PXT { 10.07.08 at 11:10 am }

I think the points made by CCS and Joel above about Unix variants is really key when they talk about compatibility and standard. I want to add that microsoft’s systems are massively incompatible with large enterprises’ OTHER enterprise, which are the ERP systems like SAP/ORACLE/PEOPLESOFT/SIEBEL/JDEDWARDS etc which run the entire enterprise from global tax reporting to manufacturing od widgets on an assembly line. These systems all use unix-variant servers underneath and getting microsoft ( spreadsheets, emails, documents, etc ) in and out of these is a major pain.

Steve Jobs needs to have a serious chat with Larry Ellison about making Unix-to-Unix integration in THAT enterprise, with Macs as the favored user-interface.

22 PXT { 10.07.08 at 11:13 am }

I wish that Ballmer would actually explain why separating the hardware from software is so great. I can think of two possibilities: (1) It gives you more production capacity – but Apple don’t make their own hardware anway, (2) hardware innovation – which Apple excel in anyway, while I suspect most hardware is designed somewhat randomly in the hope that they will come up with somehting.

So what’s the big win with that separation?

23 hodari { 10.08.08 at 5:52 am }

GWMAC g0od point. If you think that HTC Diamond is great which it is, you have still not seen everything yet!. check this out: http://www.sonyericsson.com/x1/index.aspx?en-us
This product blows the competion away and rasises the bar way up there for Apple & Co to catch up. The underlying OS is Windows Mobile 6.1. and Xperia X2 is already in the development (HINT think serious GAMES!)

Gartner might be right. It is time to drop Symbian and side with Windows Mobile. The first step has been taken by SonyEricsson. Nokia will follow soon – they have already licenced the Exchange Client from MS a testatment that Exchange is here to stay and that translates to Microsoft!.

24 ducker { 10.25.08 at 6:51 pm }

Corrections for this article…

What Ballmer was trying to say is that the future for smartphones would not come from today’s leaders.
He did.. but what u attributed to him after he didnt. If apple wins his correct he was pointing out palm / microsoft/ PC developers will be the future mobile developers.. obvious apple proved his point. Your really grasping at straws claiming his wrong on this one.

[Your spin on his comments is ridiculous to anyone who read what he actually said. Ballmer was clearly not saying that Apple was going to be the future winner; he was claiming that non-licensed platforms had no future.]

Zune vs ipod.. Zune was released much later.. the sales ratio from zune to ipod would be similar from apple tv to windows media center… wouldnt it?
Point dismissed. First to market advantage.

[Again, the iPhone blew away Windows Mobile despite its head start in 2004. Plenty of Zune fans thought that the Zune could do the same to the iPod. After all, while Apple started selling the iPod in 2001, it didn't have tremendous sales for several years, and every year grew dramatically. Microsoft should have been able to do with the Zune what Apple did to Microsoft and RIM with the iPhone, but Microsoft failed miserably. The iPhone just demonstrates how miserably Microsoft failed. ]

3 Times you mention that MS dosent make pcs or license the hardware… Apple assembles Intel PCs designed for windows and sticks a sticker on them. My PC runs OSX with almost no modification.. yet i prefer to run xp on the same box. MS makes the xbox and u want them to licesne it? Apple dosent licesne hardware they are currently suing someone who is trying to.

Your ranting about ms with no apparent point in this section. MS chooses to not make pc because they will get anti trust suits against them if they do. One of the many monopolys apple can abuse by MS is forbidden from. (Windows must unbundle media player in the uk… where are the restrictions for itunes??).

[Microsoft choses not to make a PC because they don't think there is money in hardware. Yet they did do just that with the Xbox and Zune, thinking they'd do better copying Apple in hardware than in perpetuating the Windows software market into new markets . However, Microsoft has failed at both.]

While observers expressed confidence in Microsoft’s ability to bring down iTunes with its consortium of PlaysForSure partners in 2004….
um wtf ?? few to nobody believed they were going to take down itunes. Your recasting history.

[Go read CNET from 2004-2006. Only after Microsoft failed spectacularly has the pinhead tech media stopped cheerleading for the company's failures.]

The next section describes how everyone needs exchange support… and have taken it up the apple nokia all pay ms so they can connect to exchange. Good buisness for MS .

Time to look at the hardware… apparently “Smartphones with a bad user interface, lethargic performance, security holes, crashing instability, and long boot times can’t be rationalized around with a Ctl Alt Del or fed RAM until they work acceptably”

.. I can listen to bluetooth music (which is reencoded on my device in real time) whilst routing on google maps, downloading email and transfering files over wifi all at once.. hows the iphone go at that?

The iphone is like os9.. it can do 1 thing at onece.. its not a real operating system its a hack. Ive coded for it and there are vast differences to coding for true osx just the same as there are differences between coding for windows mobile and windows. Anyone who thinks coding for iphone = coding for osx hasnt done it… or hasnt ever coded multiplatform before. Cross platform benefit is neligable on windows and apple.. want true cross platform code it in java.. or flash… oh wait weres the iphone support for them??

Hardware features… they are already all out in several wm 6.1 phones theres no waiting unless your an apple fanboy trying to delude the public into steve jobs unreality field. Try freewarepocketpc.net if you want to see free new apps that use those features.

Integration with itunes.. nice… but how many iphone users actually pay for all there songs? Ok now in the real world ppl copy their music collection to their phone and play it.

Conclusion …Windows 7 will be far too late.. yet almost all the features u attribute to it have been in 6.1 or earlier and are featured in phones right now.

Conclusion Apple fanboy denying the state of affairs to make it look apples once again about to destroy microsoft. ….

Keep dreaming

Btw android symbian and linux os are all bombing on phones atm.. the future is ms vs apple.. just like pcs .. with linux in a cheap 3rd world 3rd position

[If Symbian is "bombing" with its 55% and dropping market share, what is the word for Windows Mobile's 12% and dropping market share? WiMo will only be increasingly irrelevant.]

25 ducker { 10.25.08 at 8:38 pm }

http://asia.cnet.com/crave/2008/09/15/rim-the-biggest-winner-for-q2-smart-phone-market-share/

Rim the big winner.. with apple doing well and ms growning.. linux and symbian usage down. I predict ms will overtake blackberry in the same way it overtook palm. iphone and windows mobile will win over blackberry users evtually making it a two horse race.

26 The Mad Hatter { 10.25.08 at 9:41 pm }

Conclusion …Windows 7 will be far too late.. yet almost all the features u attribute to it have been in 6.1 or earlier and are featured in phones right now.

Conclusion Apple fanboy denying the state of affairs to make it look apples once again about to destroy microsoft. ….

Keep dreaming

Btw android symbian and linux os are all bombing on phones atm.. the future is ms vs apple.. just like pcs .. with linux in a cheap 3rd world 3rd position

[If Symbian is "bombing" with its 55% and dropping market share, what is the word for Windows Mobile's 12% and dropping market share? WiMo will only be increasingly irrelevant.]

MS has traditionally only done well on PCs. In every other market they have made some sales, but not managed to make a real breakthrough. I don’t see this changing while the current management is running the company.

The IPhone is not perfect, but consumers have voted with their wallets in large numbers for it, while they haven’t done so for Windows Mobile. It’s possible that Windows Mobile is superior to OSX on phones (don’t know, haven’t used either – my phone is a Motorola Razr), but even if it is technically superior, this does not matter if consumers would rather buy something else. Look at Palm. The Palm OS is supposed to be a clunker, but people have been buying more Palm OS phones than Windows OS phones from Palm. If the numbers are as lopsided towards Palm OS as I’ve heard, I wouldn’t be surprised to see Palm drop Windows Mobile.

27 How Apple could slay Google at WWDC 2010 — RoughlyDrafted Magazine { 05.26.10 at 10:11 am }

[...] Myth 8: iPhone will lose out to Steve Ballmer’s Windows Mobile 7 in 2010 Why Apple’s Tim Cook Did Not Threaten Palm Pre [...]

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