Daniel Eran Dilger
Random header image... Refresh for more!

You Want the Truth? You Can’t Handle the Truth!

Elitism2
Daniel Eran Dilger
Someone who I am no longer allowed to name has reported that my scoop about Microsoft’s “I’m a PC” ads using Macs was non-noteworthy, while also reporting that Microsoft’s canceled third Seinfeld ad was. The problem is that I reported both publicly a week ago, and the 90,000 visits to RDM on that first specific article (and untold traffic to other web sites who syndicated my reports) say otherwise.

[graphic thanks to reader KG]

Microsoft $300 Million Ads
Microsoft’s Mojave Attempts to Wet Vista’s Desert
Microsoft’s Mojave Experiment Exposes Serious Vista Problems
Paul Thurrott calls Apple “the Bad Guys” of Microsoft’s $300 Million Ads
Gates, Seinfeld and the $300 Million Ad to Nowhere
Microsoft’s $300 million ad campaign tumbles with new PC ads
Microsoft’s “Windows vs Walls” Ad Tries to Think Different, Fails
Microsoft’s “I’m a PC” Millions Actually Promoting the Mac
Microsoft’s ‘I’m a PC’ Campaign Keeps Getting Stranger (With Videos
I’m a PC too… touché
.
“I don’t care about the fact that the ads themselves were produced on Macs,” the writer said. “I think you’d be hard-pressed to find any major ad agency that doesn’t produce their creative work on Macs. Making fun of Microsoft for this would be like making fun of Apple because they use Windows PCs for things like SAP.”

Or more precisely, it would be like finding that Apple was advertising the Mac to do things that nobody needs a PC for, and then using a PC to say that. Apple doesn’t advertise Macs for use in SAP or industrial design or for retail handheld EasyPay devices. There is nothing ironic about Apple using PCs or Windows-based products for tasks that Apple does not compete against.

In stark contrast, the “I’m a PC” ads clearly represented that there is nothing special about Macs and obviously implied that a generic PC is just as good, if not preferable, to ever using a Mac. That fact that the ad work was done using Macs is therefore very relevant, and the 90,000 people who hit that article on my website over the last week indicate that most people saw some clearly hysterical irony involved with that.

Parroting Microsoft’s damage control spin that “As is common in almost all campaign workflow, agencies and production houses use a wide variety of software and hardware to create, edit and distribute content, including both Macs and PCs” is silly enough for news organizations to see through.

As Asher Moses wrote in the Sydney Morning Herald, “The revelation is ironic because the ads are part of a broader $300 million campaign designed to spruce up Windows Vista’s image and tout the PC’s advantages over the Mac.”

Moses may have connected all his dots independently of my reporting, which had identified last week the obscure detail that Jerry Seinfeld was featured in a Think Different ad, but the fact that the news I broke was indeed newsworthy is impossible to argue against.

‘I’m a PC’ made on a Mac – smh.com.au

That Secret Third Ad.

“What’s interesting to me is the report of a third, never-aired Seinfeld spot,” the same person wrote. “I heard the same thing last week, privately, from a friend in Seattle. But now here it is in print. If true, it’s proof that Microsoft’s claim that they’d only ever planned to run two Seinfeld ads and for just two weeks is, in fact, a crock.”

I reported this fact last week. Of course, you don’t have to read my work, but don’t suggest you have special knowledge conferred to you by friends in Seattle when a couple hundred thousand of my readers were informed of this six days ago.

And as long as I’m poking fun at my pariah status granted by certain members of the Mac establishment (and yes, there are plenty of Mac personalities who loathe me as much as Paul Thurrott, Rob Enderle, and apparently most of Nokia do for daring to point out the nudie bits on their emperor of world view on occasion, something everyone is quick to do whenever I say something they disagree with), I should also call out a number of commercial Mac news organizations (ahem) who syndicated my article without providing any attribution, not only to me but also to my source who presented the embarrassing details that Microsoft is now trying to deflect.

Something else that is unchallengeable: Microsoft’s $300 million campaign is clearly funneling lots of extra free publicity to Apple’s Mac platform, which is obviously not what Microsoft had in mind.

Microsoft’s $300 million ad campaign tumbles with new PC ads

Did you like this article? Let me know. Comment here, in the Forum, or email me with your ideas.

Like reading RoughlyDrafted? Share articles with your friends, link from your blog, and subscribe to my podcast (oh wait, I have to fix that first). It’s also cool to submit my articles to Digg, Reddit, or Slashdot where more people will see them. Consider making a small donation supporting this site. Thanks.

  • gus2000

    Are you sure you’re an elitist, Daniel? I never see you at the meetings.

  • http://johnsessays.blogspot.com John Muir

    Gruber can be a bit of a dick about who he attributes. He obviously reads RDM but doesn’t like linking to anything he agrees with. All I recall were the opening article on the Podcaster affair, and that old one about iPods running “snojob”.

    If you’re a developer with a blog and have a post badmouthing the App Store right now: you seem to be a sure link. I actually agree with him on this particular one, but his tactic of selective silence seems disingenuous.

  • gecko

    Please, please don’t go down this path. You’ve got many fascinating things to say about technology (and I don’t even mind the political posts), but this kind of internecine sniping is petty.

  • Jay

    The first sentence of your article is more than kind of scary! Are you implying that Gruber has threatened you with the potential for legal action in the event that you specifically use his name in any of your articles?

    Seriously, do explain that…at least a little bit? My mind is racing right now.

  • Phildikian

    Perhaps Gruber got his feelings hurt over the whole App store volley that he only contributed one serve to.

    I agree with a lot of his observations, but he can be surprisingly short-sighted. As for the whole App store debacle, I think he is really jumping on this one hard almost to a fanatical degree which calls into question his objectiveness. I do agree that Apple could be more specific in letting people know what they can and can’t do (or what they could do to modify an app to be accepted) – but there is this hysteria over developers who are being painted as ‘quivering’ over whether Apple will accept their app or not – total bull.

  • twilightmoon

    Gruber has no comments section on his website. Not unheard of in the blogosphere, but not common, especially among Tech oriented blogs.

    Being unable or unwilling to answer challenges to your points of view while spouting off, and linking to those that agree is rather shoddy, and frankly cowardly.

    If Gruber is afraid to address your points, I think that says it all.

  • http://thesmallwave.com treestman

    Daniel,

    Too many Mac bloggers have decided it’s better to appear “impartial” and “unbiased”. Maybe the Windows campaign of calling them fanbois, etc. is finally working. Also, grabbing some page hits from the 90% of Windows users — now that the Apple voice cannot simply be silenced — is hard to resist.

    A shame, really, as the Apple community’s passion for Apple was it’s greatest strength and now, despite denials to the contrary, many in that community spend more time waffling. The truth is, some are approaching Thurrott in their ability to dance both sides of an issue.

    Over a year ago, after I’d been blogging for about six weeks, I was interviewed by another site. The following question/answer excerpt is pertinent:

    Q: Is there any advice you would give to bloggers in the Mac Community?

    A: “I will offer an opinion, but I wouldn’t call it advice. As Apple has become more and more successful and is (albeit begrudgingly) getting some respect in tech publications, even those aimed at corporate users, I see the Mac community “toning it down” a little bit. Long before blogging existed, Mac users were very vocal (passionate) about the Mac and Apple and the company’s overall philosophy. Indeed, I think there’s little argument that this passion is what kept the platform alive after a misguided board of directors ousted Jobs in ’85 and a succession of CEOs with little vision simply tried to cram the Mac through every channel possible. Do you remember the Performa infomercial? I think I wept for all of humanity when I saw that.

    Personally, I see no reason to tone it down just because Apple is successful and some of the big boys are letting them play in the sand box….”

    You, Daniel, do not tone it down, and personally I appreciate that. I think many in the Mac community who wish you’d “behave” are simply upset that Windows advocates can single you out as a fanboi, unreasonable, etc. Nonsense. I’m sick of those 20 year-old arguments. It’s simply the price to be paid for being vocal and passionate like the Mac community used to be.

  • luisd

    Hey Dan, calm down. You should go and have a look at the screenshot in my Flickr account. I have had close to 60,000 views, and lots of comments. And they are coming from all over the internet, not only Mac sites. The vast majority of the comments are positive and understand the irony. I have had 2 very rude ones that I erased.

    Flickr is a non-technical website. You get people from all sorts, not only techies. They all got the irony, whatever the media is saying.

    Moreover, 60,000 views in 6 days is more than twice the traffic I had in 3 years! Good advertising for my photos too! :)

  • qka

    Yeah, Macs in ads. Today I saw a TV ad for some Windows degunking product/service. I was pretty much ignoring it – until the showed the “afflicted” user using a white iMac – either a G5 or first gen Intel. As if that needed their product. So much for credibility.

    And in so many ads where a computer is shown, you just have to love how they retouch the Apple out, or cover it with a sticky note, so as to not show what brand the computer is.

  • chuckb

    Why can’t you mention John Gruber by name?

  • lmasanti

    One thing that intrigued me all that time is why Microsoft had to point out that they are throwing “300 millions” in publicity, that they were paying Seinfield “10 millions”… and so on.
    The value of Apple’s advertisement is quite higher than the money they put, thru a long standing tradition of secrecy, Steve’s showmanship, etc., etc..

    So, from the very beginning they are claiming that they must put a lot of money to be show out.

    That’s lame.

  • siegling

    Gruber’s wife _is_ a lawyer, fwiw.

  • nelsonart

    I was surprised as I was commenting on the Macworld blog earlier that one of the big chiefs took a poster to task for linking to RDM, even going further to offer his negative opinion of RDM.

    I thought it was strange, coming from the always-sensible Macworld staff.

    I remember the first time I read Dan’s blog. I was stunned. Such detailed analysis. Where did he get all this data? How could he know the stuff he’s writing without working at Apple?

    The best one was after Steve Jobs went on and on at a keynote about how an LCD wants to be flat and to stick the computer guts behind this ideally flat LCD would just go against everything it stood for, everything it wanted to be.

    Then Dan writes about his idea of a flat panel iMac and it’s exactly what Apple delivered. To argue against Steve Jobs and then be proven right… I think that takes the prize. We all wondered what was coming, but dismissed the current iMac paradigm because it violated Steve’s sense of aesthetics.

    I’m not a butt kisser, however. Dan’s abilities in tech haven’t spread to politics and economics. And I think he’s wrong on the App store. Gruber and Macworld have it exactly right.

    Some day Dan has to come clean. Where does he get all his data? I read a lot of stuff online about computers and no one can match this blog for details and accurate fortune telling.

  • nat

    @ nelsonart,

    If you’re talking about the comments in the article As App Store banning continues, iPhone developers protest, that would have been me linking to Dan’s articles and defending his arguments, which I share. :D Everyone I talked to (Breen, Frakes, Moren) had the same fundamental perspective on the issues, though Frakes did bring up a good point with an app called Mobility Today, which allows the user to download the podcast of the app’s developer. Wonder how or why that one got through.

    Oh, and I don’t get the point in chiding Dan for expressing his political beliefs you simply disagree with.

  • nelsonart

    “Oh, and I don’t get the point in chiding Dan for expressing his political beliefs you simply disagree with.”

    Simple. I don’t want him to get a big head. Have you seen his bandages?

  • The Mad Hatter

    Microsoft has always been incompetent at marketing, and shows no sign of improvement. I don’t know if they ever will improve at marketing, for this to happen there would have to be a huge shakeup in management, and I don’t see that happening until the current management has done such serious damage to the company that it can’t be ignored (don’t forget which shareholder holds the greatest number of shares).

    Actually I can see one scenario where a management shake up could occur – someone like Warren Buffett would have to publicly chastise the company’s management for their incompetence.

  • PerGrenerfors

    As the Mac platform has come back from its near-death experience its bloggers have journeyed towards the middle, like treestman writes. This is the fate of every movement that grows. There’s no community without politics. To be a voice that matters in a growing community receiving more attention requires you to let go of most of your “revolutionary” topics and rhetoric.

    I think some bloggers, like Mr Gruber, feel caught in the middle. They want to preserve their indie status, but the more hardcore you get the less you matter. An easy way to strike a balance is to openly criticize someone who’s significantly further away from the middle even if this person is in your own camp in many ways.

    Both Gruber and Daniel always take their chance to jump on MS and support Obama. I guess some of us readers shake our heads and wonder “why can’t they just be friends and hug?”

  • http://all.net/ hylas

    I come from a newspaper family, my Father was a Publisher/Editor/Columnist/Managing Editor/Editor, etc.
    I was Chief Bottle Washer, and the Photographer’s Tag-along (I loaded cameras and did the running).
    You can imagine I’ve read some excellent writing.

    Daniel is gifted.

    Do it once – do it right – do your homework.
    Never apologize, just run corrections.

    Oh, and nothing, nothing. EVER. Above the banner.

    As for “He That Shall Not Be Named”:
    “Someone got their new man-panties from Sir Victoria’s Secret into a sailor’s knot.”

    (Quote stolen from):

    http://thinkprogress.org/2008/09/11/hannity-meltdown/

  • Michael

    wow… so many varied comments ;) All I can say is… Dan, you’re doing a great job.. really enjoyed the 20+ articles in 2 weeks.. I guess it’s still because you’re recovering? Anyway, you make a bunch of rational arguments… it’s just some people don’t like to hear the truth.. or they filter it and interpret it differently than you meant to say it, thereby disagreeing with you. Either way, nice stat on the website! I had no idea 90k people visited your website within the last 2 weeks… dang. And where in the world DO you get your statistics? ;) Still, even if they’re partly made-up, they still work for the argument, so I suppose it’s a moot point :)

    Btw, for those listening, I AM NOT a fanboy… I use Macs and Windows reguarly… it’s just that I prefer the Mac… why? Well, it gives me less headaches of how to configure my internet connection for instance. Vista has this firewall business, and you have to state that “your computer is behind a router” even though it isnt… before it even lets you go online. Why did MS invent this “feature”?! It’s pointless, and it takes the likes of a computer expert like me to figure out where the damn setting is. Why can’t you just connect to the internet through ethernet or wireless and start browsing? That’s what drove me to the Mac… simplicity. Not the features, not the security, not the performance gain, although all of those are welcome benefits :)

    These geezers advocating for Windows while hissing at the Mac will never get it.

  • Jesse

    Dan, my two cents is, walk away. Blog-fights never do nobody no good.

  • isserley

    @jesse: my thoughts exactly – and lets instill some politics in this comments section as well:
    McCain once said in the primaries that running against Mitt Romney was like fighting with a pig. “You both get dirty, but the pig likes it.” – SCNR

    Matt

  • oomu

    I understand how Gruber can be annoying

    but you don’t need to defend yourself. I’ll still read your good articles, facts and arguments.

    I can see when Gruber is wrong (of course it was wrong with the mac-made ads, it was NOT an ad about Microsoft Office, but how PC is all you need.. well.. in fact no, you need mac to do ads :) )

    of course it’s BAD communication for an ads. why ? Because many people reacts like me. and Medias too. it’s bad :)


    so, Daniel, let Gruber makes blog-fight, all you need to defend yourself is just to continue to write text made from FACTS.

    and yeah, no one sane cares about the “mac establishment” There are a fanboy mac establishment ? I’m sure I’m more important than that establishment.

  • Nick Barron

    Well, while I agree that Blog fights rarely accomplish anything.

    I would not class this as a fight, Dan has made his point and that is that.

    Keep it up Dan the recent wave of articles have been good and thought provoking. I am still on the fence regarding the app store, though I currently am not taking exception with Apple’s actions I think they could be handling the issue far better.

  • Nick Barron

    @ ommu

    “and yeah, no one sane cares about the “mac establishment” There are a fanboy mac establishment ? I’m sure I’m more important than that establishment”

    Amen.

  • http://www.roughlydrafted.com danieleran

    I didn’t mean to imply that John Gruber has ever threatened me about anything. I think he’s a good guy. I’ve written him back and forth on occasion and I like his Daring Fireball work. We disagree sometimes, but I think that’s because we are both real people.

    I find it somewhat frustrating or perhaps comical that Mac writers, and particularly corporate media types studiously ignore what I write. Maybe it’s because I push them to work harder.

    Over the last month I’ve had 516,000 visits and 902,000 page views.

  • oomu

    Danieleran : it’s simple

    you came of nowhere (appleinsider ? what is that ? it’s not Yahoo),

    you did not create a blog around your personality and life, but a website about Apple stories and AFTER you began to speak about yourself

    you put cold facts in text, about things who annoy pundits. They would like to ignore you

    you are pretty adamant about the errors of others. It’s also why I read you first, you write stuff like “they say that and here why they are Wrong : ” and you go on finding old facts, old stories proving how all was wrong.

    it’s very exhilarating to read because of course I lived all you told : old stupid gartners predictions, old microsoft astrosturf, old apple crazy scheme and so on.

    you are provoking, pundis and established people don’t like that. But it’s why I stopped yahoo/slasdhot/wired and I read blog like yours.


    One day you will be old and a crazy young folk with a new crazy independent point of view will annoy you :) but he/she will be right, he/she will understand his/her time.

  • airmanchairman

    @Mad Hatter:
    “Microsoft has always been incompetent at marketing, and shows no sign of improvement”

    I beg to strongly disagree, sir. Microsoft’s strength, and indeed possibly its ultimate weakness, is marketing. Its PR & perception of itself may be hilariously skewed, as we have seen in the past few months (Mojave, Seinfeld, I’m a PC et al) but its marketing juggernaut is hard to question.

    I have no doubt that if Bill Gates could turn back time, he would have reined back his marketing attack-dogs a little bit against the likes of DR-DOS, Word Perfect, Lotus 123, Netscape Navigator and others that they mercilessly ground into the dust, thus depriving his software engineers of any meaningful competition to improve against – the result being that for the past 15 or so years, they’ve had as their only competition the previous decade’s version of their own software, UNTIL NOW…

    It must be difficult for a monopoly to avoid going into defence mode (led inevitably by Sales and Marketing) when as far ahead of the competition as Microsoft finds itself, but it can be fatal not to (as Apple found out in the 80s).

    Only a spiritual revolution, coupled with a wholesale butchering of middle management and their godfathers higher up in the hierarchy (as happened in the mid-90s at a well-known corporation) can save Microsoft from eventual decline, in my humble estimation.

    Meanwhile, we sit here applauding both sides of the eternal debate from our front-row seats, marvelling at history unfolding in real-time before our bulging eyes…

    Keep ’em coming, DED, don’t you ever stop.

  • Jon T

    Personally, I think John Gruber is losing it a bit. He always used to be rational and well balanced and his posts were infrequent and often eloquent. My RSS feed is full of useless new micro posts/links and when he writes, it seems more emotional and a bit irrational. To the extent that on Tuesday I deleted the Daring Fireball RSS feed. Seems I might not have been the only one.

    In the meantime Dan, please carry on the good work. Stay rational. Stay with tech! Thanks.

  • Jon T

    Just read your comment: “Over the last month I’ve had 516,000 visits and 902,000 page views.”

    What?!?! That’s serious Dan. I doff my hat in respect.

    And I still want to see you publish a book about all this stuff as I suggested to you a couple of years back…

  • BigDan

    I read both DF and RDM every day, both are excellent but I do feel that Gruber is losing it a bit and is also getting a wee bit big headed about his writing skills. He’s good but Mr Dilger is in a class of his own at the moment. Brilliant work, keep it up.

  • Jeff C.

    twilightmoon – No comments is cowardly? Here’s a thought: If you need to tell him somethine, send him an e-mail. He usually writes back, and when he gets a lot of similar comments he makes a post on it.

    Just because he interacts with his readers in a different way doesn’t mean he’s cowardly.

    I’m a big fan of DF and of RDM and continue to enjoy both. I am amused (though somewhat saddened) by all the commentors here who seem to pick sides so quickly over a few differences of opinions between the two sites.

    If anything, the quality of BOTH sites has been rising over the years. The fact that there are people out there who can’t stand more than one point of view is kind of insane. Oh well, their loss, I guess. I’ll continue to enjoy reading both perspectives.

  • gus2000

    Maybe Gruber needs to have his jaw wired shut too, lol

    For those of you who’ve never run a web server, it logs data about each requested page, including: remote IP address, OS type, browser type/version, etc. And since each entry is timestamped, visits can be analyzed for total duration and of each page, navigation path, etc.

    So when Daniel says he has XXX hits, he’s not making it up and doesn’t need to.

    I have this information on my webserver also, but sadly my logs are filled with hits by slavebots poking around for vulnerabilities. :(

  • http://www.blue-ember.com Steffan

    Don’t take this the wrong way, but I also don’t think it’s a bad thing that the so-called Mac establishment considers you a pariah. Invite-only SV events are overrated (not that you care about them).

    Furthermore, to the extent that you succeed without their help, the less power they have later on to call upon you for favors, and when you refuse, to try and destroy you.

    Your keen insight and entertaining writing style has afforded you a high profile with loyal and evangelical readers (I felt personally gratified when you were featured on MacBreak). But the “Digerati” are all too often a mere echo chamber, and are beholden to the tyranny of thought that comes with being too close to the issues (and each other).

    If I had to venture a guess, I’d say that’s what’s keeping MacBreak, Daring Fireball, and others from having a more level head on the App Store issue: maybe they’re too close to some people that have been personally burned by the policy. It seems since you called him on it, Gruber’s analysis of other topics has suffered as a result. I noticed it in his Mac/PC post yesterday, and I can’t have been alone. (your stats are evidence).

    Oh one more thing… is there any chance that someone writing as Pauper McFilth would expose the backroom dealings that prevent Mac establishment types being named?

  • AdamC

    Keep out the good work, really enjoy reading your blog, anyway any blog which does not have a comment section is not worth the time to visit (MHO). Even Small Wave has one – another of my favourite.

  • John E

    “I find it somewhat frustrating or perhaps comical that Mac writers, and particularly corporate media types studiously ignore what I write. Maybe it’s because I push them to work harder.” – Dan

    well, Dan, it’s not hard to explain. you’re technically brilliant, so some are likely jealous because you show them up big time. but more than that, you’ve got a lot of attitude. it is fair to say you are openly contemptuous of the stupid and the phony. about half your articles attack such things (and MS). that makes RDM a great read, but it takes you out of the category of standard journalism or any possible status as a dispassionate authority. you’re too “hot” for anything corporate or establishment.

    anyway, the world needs what you do much more.

  • rickrandom

    Dan, please, stick to the excellent and informative articles on tech and don’t get caught up in attacking other bloggers.

    Your analysis is often the most interesting and accurate on the web, and a lot of your articles on the history and future of Apple and Microsoft should be required reading for anyone with even a passing interest in computers.

    However, when you personally attack others, even if they deserve it, I think it really does you a disservice, as I think it can hurt your reputation. Just take down their arguments, cooly and calmly apply some of your obvious insight and show how wrong they are. Don’t let them write you off as a shrill fanboy.

    Keep the articles coming though, they’re very much appreciated…

  • http://johnsessays.blogspot.com John Muir

    Interesting thread.

    I was surprised to find Glenn Fleishman assume a comment in favour of RDM at Macworld was a fake alias of Daniel’s own making. Talk about insulting! Yes, there are a lot of actual readers over here. Thanks for presuming us fake!

    Google for Glennf and “sock puppet” if you fancy a look. (I’m on my touch so no copy/paste.) Indeed Twitter is pretty rife with RDM bashing from the Mac technorati. Gruber seems pretty level compared to some of them.

    As for why they have their knickers in a twist? Ah, who cares. Funny how they keep on reading!

  • follower

    I think Gruber’s just grouchy these days because of the Yankees not making the postseason.

  • The Mad Hatter

    @Mad Hatter:
    “Microsoft has always been incompetent at marketing, and shows no sign of improvement”

    I beg to strongly disagree, sir. Microsoft’s strength, and indeed possibly its ultimate weakness, is marketing. Its PR & perception of itself may be hilariously skewed, as we have seen in the past few months (Mojave, Seinfeld, I’m a PC et al) but its marketing juggernaut is hard to question.

    You mean marketing cream puff. And iut’s damned easy to question, because it’s true, Microsoft is, and has always been totally incompetent at marketing.

    I have no doubt that if Bill Gates could turn back time, he would have reined back his marketing attack-dogs a little bit against the likes of DR-DOS, Word Perfect, Lotus 123, Netscape Navigator and others that they mercilessly ground into the dust, thus depriving his software engineers of any meaningful competition to improve against – the result being that for the past 15 or so years, they’ve had as their only competition the previous decade’s version of their own software, UNTIL NOW…

    Bill G never marketed against any of these companies and their products. What Microsoft did was “cut off their oxygen supply” by lobbying the computer OEMS into installing only Microsoft software on computers, and by making undocumented changes to APIs so that things quite working.

    It must be difficult for a monopoly to avoid going into defence mode (led inevitably by Sales and Marketing) when as far ahead of the competition as Microsoft finds itself, but it can be fatal not to (as Apple found out in the 80s).

    Do you have a clue what you are saying? Really? You insist that Apple held over 90% market share at one time. OK, Prove it. Apple has never held 90% market share in any area, even portable music players where they are the dominant manufacturer.

    Only a spiritual revolution, coupled with a wholesale butchering of middle management and their godfathers higher up in the hierarchy (as happened in the mid-90s at a well-known corporation) can save Microsoft from eventual decline, in my humble estimation.

    Actually what will save them will be a shareholder’s revolt. Until Bill G, the largest individual shareholder gets upset and takes action, it will be more of the same.

    By the way, what have you been smoking, I want some.

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/fotonchop/ zaxzan

    Dan, indubitably you ROCK … As always.

  • colinprince

    Hi Dan.

    I registered specifically to leave this comment.

    I read your stuff often and I enjoy it.

    I read John Gruber’s stuff often and I enjoy it.

    Please don’t go down the route of snide comments and pissing matches.

    Keep writing the good stuff, and if what you’re writing supportable information, then it’ll be obvious to readers.

    “Show it, don’t say it”, as the advice often goes.

    Thanks,
    Colin.

  • Baroosk

    Can,

    I don’t always agree with what you say. Sometimes you’re wrong.
    BUT You DO back up what you say with facts and well thought out reasons (or reasoned opinions) based on hard facts & observations.
    Like I said i don;t agree, but it’s hard to argue with you.

    As I learned growing up from Dad– You argue like a Jesuit. It’s tough to win against you.

    I’ll keep reading! Great analyses.!

    From Alaska