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iPhone Apps Store Growing Twice as Fast as iTunes Music

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Daniel Eran Dilger

Everyone was impressed last month when Apple announced moving 30 60 million downloads through the new iPhone Apps Store, bringing in $30 million of revenue (or a million dollars per day). Well, growth downloads more than doubled this month, bringing a total of 100 million downloads (and somewhere around another $70 40 million of software revenue). This has some interesting implications.

[Edit: to clarify, Apple first announced selling 10 million apps in the first 3 days, then announced 60 million downloads July 11, and most recently announced on September 9 “more than” 100 million downloads. The graphic above was corrected to show this. iPhone app sales compared to iTunes Store music has actually been four times greater at the two month milestone.]

Apple and the New Software Market
How Apple Is Changing the PC Software World… Back
iPhone Apps Store Growing Twice as Fast as iTunes Music
The Other iPhone Apps Store
SDK 3.3.3: The iPhone Podcaster Surprise Myth
Banned iPhone Apps and the John Gruber Podcaster Defense
The iPhone Monopoly Myth
.
Even if growth hits a plateau today and sales stay where they are right now, by next year Apple will have sold a half billion iPhone apps (bringing in around a half billion dollars of revenue), before the Windows Mobile 7 Skymarket launches. Of course, Apple’s mobile software sales are not likely to remain at 70 40 million per month, as its historical iTunes song sales indicate.

For comparison, the iTunes Music Store opened a year and a half after the iPod first went on sale, the same period of time as between the Apps Store opening and the iPhone’s original sale date. It took Apple two months to sell 25 million songs, and two years to sell a billion. That’s at least more than twice as long in both cases as the time taken to hit the same milestones in mobile software.

[Rephrased: iPhone app sales were:

  • ten times greater at launch than the iTunes Store song sales (10 million apps in three days vs 1 million songs in the first 5 days)
  • four times as great as iTunes music sales in its first two months (100 million apps vs 25 million songs).

Update: growth doubled to hit 200 million apps in October:

 Wp-Content Uploads 2008 10 200810211508
App Store continues to exceed iTunes song sales growth
]

Once it hit one billion songs (Feb 2006), the iTunes Store jumped to two billion a year later (Jan 2007) and then four billion in another year (Jan 2008). That’s a simple 100% year over year growth. And yet app sales are growing twice as fast more than twice as fast, meaning Apple could hit two billion software downloads by next year.

Organic growth.

I don’t think anyone has realized that Apple has short circuited the “Microsoft software hardware extortion model” by lining up a regulated software market for its iPod and iPhone hardware. As I noted in the previous article, Apple’s iTunes model for software works like a farmers’ market. It’s not designed to be wildly profitable for its organizers, but rather to attract individuals as a market destination.

Apple’s cut of iTunes revenues will enable the company to rapidly expand its merchandizing efforts and continue to give it huge market power to attract major content providers and mobile developers (as it clearly already has), and continue to develop new partnerships in the model of Nike+, Starbucks, auto integration, and so on.

 Wp-Content Uploads 2008 09 Wp-Content-Uploads-2006-12-Steve-Jobs-Wozniak-Apple-Computer

How Apple Is Changing the PC Software World… Back

A Difficult Path to Follow.
Microsoft’s Zune answer to the iPod came two years after the iTunes Store launched. Its Windows Mobile store will only be a year late. However, the iPhone software market is also growing twice as fast as iTunes songs did, which promises to leave the WiMo store in the same sort of shadow as the barren Zune Marketplace.

Other competitors will likely wish for a piece of Apple’s massive traffic in the mobile software market, but few companies share Apple’s circumstances. As with iTunes media sales, Apple has announced an intention to keep prices low and volumes high to help make media sales attractive to buyers.

That means there’s no big software profits for other hardware competitors to muscle away from Apple. It also means that the destination Apple created in iTunes adds a lot of value to Apple’s hardware, value that hardware competitors will have a hard time duplicating for their own products, because building another iTunes involves a lot of effort without any potential for a big profit payoff.

Neither Microsoft nor Google have announced any plans to build their own phone hardware, so neither has any direct hardware profits to propel store investment for their platforms. Hardware vendors with stores, such as Nokia’s Ovi media portal store and T-Mobile’s announced mobile app store for all the phones it sells, will both either have to raise their prices and lose a competitive edge, or match Apple’s prices and lose money at razor thin margins just like all of the iTunes Store competitors did in music.

Not even Wal-Mart could compete with Apple in music sales by competing with slightly lower prices. Amazon likes to advertise slightly lower music prices, but it doesn’t sell anywhere near the volume of Apple, and can hide its losses among its other sales.

While Microsoft has announced an intent to “monetize” mobile software (as it failed to do with music in Windows Media PlaysForSure and again with the Zune Marketplace), Google’s Android doesn’t even have a market mechanism in place yet. So far, its just a YouTube-style software distribution system with plans to add sales at some point.

That sets up an epic battle of unique business models for mobile software:

Apple’s iTunes
sells music, video and mobile software at low prices to lubricate the company’s hardware sales.

Microsoft Skymarket will be attempting to sell mobile software at a significant profit, and hopes sales will enhance its Windows Mobile platform, even though current WiMo software sales have done poorly.

Google Android Market is hoping to largely give software away and offer some ways to sell software to users at some point, in an effort to enhance its entire platform. The Linux desktop market has so far seen nearly zero commercial software, although there is a variety of DIY software packages.

T-Mobile will be opening a mobile software store that looks a lot like the record labels’ failed attempts to sell their music directly to consumers, as well as resembling Verizon’s BREW store, which attempts to rip off users on the same scale as wireless bills.

Nokia’s Ovi will have a lot in common with Sony’s failed Connect music store: software from a hardware company that doesn’t do software well.
Sit back and enjoy the fireworks. You already know which horse I’m betting on.

Did you like this article? Let me know. Comment here, in the Forum, or email me with your ideas.

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65 comments

1 JamesK { 09.12.08 at 1:48 am }

Wonderful analysis, Daniel. I think you’re spot on.

The App Store is a brilliant concept. It ends all fooling around searching the internet for an application that does what you want. It’s all there, in one spot, easily searchable. Even with reviews!

It reduces piracy, encouraging more developers to write more apps, allowing them to sell at reduced prices and still clear a profit.

And what I like most about it is that it gives me a sense of assurance of the quality of the software. I know several Windows users who insist on the superiority of their platform due to all the “cracked warez” out there and the sheer number of applications. I suppose viruses are applications as well.

The more you think about it, the idea of just randomly grabbing software out of the dark recesses of the internet seems like a completely loony idea. It’s like picking up coins off of a bathroom floor and putting them in your mouth.

I’m sure various FSM cranks will find reason to complain. Some will dislike the “control” that Apple holds. But I think most of all, people will dislike the fact that Apple is challenging everyone’s fundamental assumptions about the nature of the computer industry.

2 nitro { 09.12.08 at 1:52 am }

amazing to me how someone wacked out on pain meds can be inifinitely more right than 99% of the blogosphere.

well played.

3 fatbarstard { 09.12.08 at 2:00 am }

Again you elegantly demonstrate the stupidity of people who insist that Apple should focus on software sales, especially Mac OSX.

They just don’t get the Apple is a hardware company and that software lubricates sales of hardware devices. The iTunes store adds value to hardware sales in the sense that it drives volume, and in a consumer products business volume is everything…

Well Done.

4 Michael { 09.12.08 at 2:09 am }

I’m sorry, but this is a bit much to take… I agree with the previous post where the App Store is a great invention, but as far as the competition absolutely being obliterated by it seems like an overstatement. Great article Daniel, but seriously, as much as I’m a Mac fan, there are limits… and frankly the App Store only does so much for Apple ;) Despite other competitors not having a functional App Store equivalent, they can still compete and turn a profit, especially if the other wireless carriers support them and subsidize their phones more than Apple’s :( Why would the carriers do this? Well, other carriers don’t really want Apple to revolutionize their business and make them give up easy profits (too bad there isn’t much REAL competition except T-Mobile). There is no real solution to that problem that I can see so far… but as far as the App Store, it’s a great idea that will definitely revolutionize the PC market as well… maybe in the future you’ll just be using a browser and pick your OS of choice in a centralized repository (well, I guess by then you don’t really need an OS ;) ) But it’s only partly true that Nokia can’t coexist in some fashion without turning a profit… it has tons of phones out there and it’s planning on opening a unlimited music store to compete with iTunes. Meanwhile, Blackberry actually has a program called Blackberry music sync to sync your Blackberry with iTunes… The funny thing is that there is a significant amount of people that absolutely refuse to use any Apple device of any kind (but ironically their software apparently), purely because of ideological reasons. Well, these people can’t be reached very easily with reason anyway, but they’re a key part of Nokia’s and RIM’s survival strategy… And I’m sure they’ll be willing to pay, it just depends on how much. But then again, Microsoft will cater to these people as well, so maybe you’re right… the phone market might just end up like the iPod market, where the iPhone owns 75% of the smartphone market and the “wannabe” smartphones and the real smartphones from the other makers are counted in the market pie to inflate their figures ;) Well, let’s hope that the market picks the best option right now… and that appears to be the iPhone.. as long as Apple can fix all the crashing and lagging apps :)

5 John E { 09.12.08 at 2:30 am }

crucial point to add is that the large majority of the downloads have probably been the free apps. i’ve tried a lot – it’s like a demo – but only kept less than 20%. each still counts as a “sale” tho.

don’t get me wrong, i think that is great for us consumers – free apps!! and the good ones offer terrific services. but it skews the stats to the point they need a major re-calibration before using them as data. essentially the free apps expand the product itself. who needs FM radio built in (like the Zune and others) when you have AOL on line radio? you don’t.

as a hardware company like Apple, Nokia would be really stupid not to adopt the same model for its future app store for its Symbian OS phones. give the stuff away to sell phones. the farmers market, like Dan says.

MS, Android and the others will have to fall in line. No one is going to pay $15 to get an app for their OS based phones that you can buy for 99 cents for an iPhone. and adios Handango! good riddance.

6 counterproductive { 09.12.08 at 3:44 am }

“crucial point to add is that the large majority of the downloads have probably been the free apps. i’ve tried a lot – it’s like a demo – but only kept less than 20%. each still counts as a “sale” tho.”

What stats is it skewing? The 100 Million is clearly stated by both Apple and Daniel as downloads, not active users or “sales”. There are 65 Million active iTunes accounts, for both music and apps. Apple doesn’t need to prop up its numbers to feel good (like counting all new PCs as sales of Vista when most PC buyers go back to XP).

Anyway, Daniel’s figure pegged the average revenue at 70c (70 million on 100 million downloads). That already takes into account that most apps are free!

In terms of popularity and growth of the store, a download is a download. But in terms of revenue, the potential is actually much greater with apps than with songs. One billion songs is roughly 1 billion dollars, and Apple gets what 1/10 (10 cents per song?). Even if most apps are free, Apple has $99 per developer. Lets say 25% of downloads become $5 ones, one third is 312.5 million; if 10% become $10-dollar apps, one third is another 300 million. Versus 100 million on 1 billion songs.

7 newspaper advertising directory { 09.12.08 at 4:26 am }

newspaper advertising directory…

[...] see some issues that show some uncivilized act. The above picture is a sticker for some idiot using the road sign to advertise for his services, to put down a building and dig holes for new structure buildings, basically he owns a [...]…

8 Berend Schotanus { 09.12.08 at 5:31 am }

Look at the photo in the article. You see Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs at the beginning of their epic journey through modern technology.

Now shake away your bias and look at the same picture again. You see two 25 year old university drop outs with no money but with a cute smile. (OK, the picture was taken after Apple II came out so by that time they did have some money but they really started with none)
Suppose you are looking with contemporary eyes to computer business in 1974, it wouldn’t really have made sense to predict the business would be taken over by two young kids no-one had ever heard of. You could instead have written a useful article weighing the chances of IBM against let’s say Xerox and AT&T, predicting a bright future for newcomer Digital. It is not a credible idea that unexpected newcomers take over, but even when you take the idea seriously it is not very practical because there are thousands of 25 year old university drop outs out there and you never know which one is gonna make it.

So about the article: great analysis. I love to read Apple is kicking those other crap out of the marketplace. The article weighs the chances of well established companies, each of them existing for several decades, and for good reasons. Only I keep searching for a clue for this next unexpected twist, which I know is not predictable.

;-)

9 John Muir { 09.12.08 at 8:17 am }

@Berend

Well…

The old “two kids starting business from a garage” ideal still exists. But it only ever works in brand new areas which have not been exploited yet. Apple sold pre-made computers to the wider circle of geeks than those who cared to build their own Altair, for instance. Such a mid 70′s article as you described about IBM and Digital’s future prospects in the Personal or Home Computer Market … would have been daring to write as it was a market only the geeks themselves saw!

Google is probably the better example than Apple for the kind of market changing startup you’re thinking about. Google came into search – an already fairly well established field – and blew it apart with a brilliant algorithm and a minimalist eye. They didn’t quite start in their garage though. As Mike Markkula was to Apple, so was university hosted VC for Google as I understand.

The web, like software, remains easier to break into than hardware. You don’t need as much cash to get started, and there’s less people to employ from day one, greater manoeuvrability and so on. So I don’t honestly expect anyone quite the like of young Apple to emerge and revolutionise everything quite as broadly as they did…

But like you said, I may as well quote Niels Bohr:
“Prediction is very difficult, especially if it’s about the future”

10 Berend Schotanus { 09.12.08 at 10:38 am }

@John

You are right.
Google IS a great example. Predicting search business in 1997 would have been even harder than predicting personal computing in 1974. And of course today we have Mark Zuckerberg’s Facebook.

Innovation probably always means asymmetric competition. Maybe you can say that for Apple in phone business as well – Apple is a newcomer challenging the establishment – certainly you can say that for Apple in music business. Try and immagine you predicted back in 1997 Sony’s most important competitor would be called Apple…

11 Ren { 09.12.08 at 11:00 am }

A significant roadblock in the continuing trend for the app downloads is that the number of available apps is significantly smaller than the number of available songs (what, three orders of magnitude?). Also, I expect the tendency for a user to continue to purchase apps over time is smaller than their tendency to continue to purchase music.

12 beanie { 09.12.08 at 1:34 pm }

Daniel wrote:
“by next year Apple will have sold a billion iPhone apps ”

Oops, you confuse the wording Apple uses to “hype” the store. They said “downloads” not “sold”. If they generate $1,000,000 revenue a day at an average price per app of $5, that would make be around 200,000 apps sold per day.

At that rate, 30 days would sell 6 million apps. In 60 days, 12 million apps. So 100 million downloads sounds better than 12 million sold.

13 danieleran { 09.12.08 at 1:53 pm }

@ benie: it doesn’t matter if Apple is selling mobile apps at a profit or distributing free apps, because Apple isn’t doing it to make money, but rather to attract attention to the iPhone.

Distributing a billion iPhone apps (or however many it will sell over the next year) will create a huge installed base of software for iPhone users before WM7 even ships. How is Microsoft going to come from behind and “Zune” the phone market? This is the iTunes Store all over again. You can quibble about numbers and make up your own statistics about what you think Apple is selling, but you don’t have any facts to support your numbers and you haven’t factored in acceleration.

I’m not claiming above that Apple is going to be rolling in a quarter billion of revenue from iPhone apps, but rather that iTunes will continue to promote massive mobile software development for the iPhone because of the revenues coming it, something that is already evident.

14 alan { 09.12.08 at 2:17 pm }

I believe Apple said on Aug 11 that there had been 60 million downloads for $30 million in revenue.

That skews the acceleration, revenue, and comparisons with ITMS quite a bit.

What I have noticed about the app store is that the pricing seems really low for the functionality that you get – most apps are 4.99 and under, so for less than a fancy Starbucks drink you can get a new game, sports aggregator, or what have you. The effect this will have on other phones will be to bring there prices way down and highlight where Apple is ahead: the ease of adding new sw capabilities. Again, not a big revenue driver for Apple but a decent differentiator for the hardware.

15 daGUY { 09.12.08 at 3:44 pm }

What I find interesting about the App Store is how Apple’s essentially doing the exact opposite of the other mobile providers. Other providers give away “free” phones, then sell expensive apps; Apple’s giving away free apps to help sell a $200 phone.

As the saying goes, “software sells systems”! People see the value of the hardware when they see all the cool software that runs on it. The fact that a lot of it is free just sweetens the deal.

It’s exactly like Apple’s approach of including iLife for free to sell Macs. You use exclusive software to add value to the (more profitable) hardware.

16 The Mad Hatter { 09.12.08 at 10:55 pm }

Google Android Market is hoping to largely give software away and offer some ways to sell software to users at some point, in an effort to enhance its entire platform. The Linux desktop market has so far seen nearly zero commercial software, although there is a variety of DIY software packages.

But the “DIY” software that is available, is of excellent quality, and quite capable of competing against the best that Microsoft can produce. Um, on the other hand that isn’t hard. But seriously it competes fairly well against a lot of the software available on OSX as well, though very rarely well against Apple’s own software. For a hardware company Apple does software real well.

FYI, we currently computers running OSX, Ubuntu, Windows XP, Sabayon, and Belinix in our house.

17 nelsonart { 09.12.08 at 11:09 pm }

The App store is incredible and will help drive high end iPod / iPhone sales. I know – I just bought an iPod touch.

My worry is Apple’s big red kill switch. I’d rather they let the marketplace decide whether or not an App such as Ruby has any value than try to decide for us.

Recently, they turned down an App that functioned similar to iTunes. Having not read the details, I’ll gladly concede the point if there is something going on that would harm the ecosystem.

Only the worst offenders should be turned away. Otherwise, Apple’s heavy-handed policy could turn away developers.

18 webrs { 09.13.08 at 12:06 am }

Good luck Microsoft! We just need to get rid of communist at&t and Iphone will become the only phone.

19 soho_1 { 09.13.08 at 8:42 am }

Quote from link above:
In the month since Apple opened an online software clearinghouse called the App Store, users have downloaded more than 60 million programs for the iPhone, Chief Executive Steve Jobs said in an interview at Apple’s headquarters. While most of those applications were free, Apple sold an average of $1 million a day in applications for a total of about $30 million in sales over the month, Mr. Jobs said.

20 Carpadium Blog » Blog Archive » It’s all about the platform { 09.13.08 at 7:46 pm }

[...] that I didn’t get this post out a little earlier! When I read articles like this [update: and THIS!]it just confirms everything I believe about the essential elements of a good product and good [...]

21 designguy { 09.13.08 at 8:15 pm }

Everyone should take a look outside of their proverbial boxes.

Seriously…
Do you really think that Apple’s “App Store” will only play host to iPhone and iPod Touches?
When one takes a moment to reflect on Apple’s ease of scalability, they may arrive at the most likely future.
The App Store will play host to these obvious platform possibilities; iTouch(Slate), Apple TV, and Macs. One can argue against me all day long, but in the end a simple truth emerges.
These are all new and expanding markets that demand customized solutions, else they will be leveled by their competitors feature sets.

How long Apple will take with the Apple TV (App Store and SDK) is my question.
Apple TV 3.0 anyone?

Daniel is making an excellent case by sticking to what has already transpired. Adding to that, the other stores will not be truly successful in the end, because Apple is to well integrated across all their products.

Sorry everyone, not enough time to go into depth with what I am saying.

22 Carpadium Blog » Blog Archive » This isn’t so much “bad” as it is “terminal” { 09.14.08 at 1:10 am }

[...] in my praise for the iPhone App Store. Let’s face it, how many online services generate this kind of traffic and interest in such a short period of time? I really can’t think of too [...]

23 The Mad Hatter { 09.14.08 at 1:20 am }

These are all new and expanding markets that demand customized solutions, else they will be leveled by their competitors feature sets.

Yeah, right. Apple’s competition since the start of the century has demonstrated a level of incompetence that beggars the imagination. If you wrote a novel showing businesses this incompetent no one would believe it.

So even if Apple were to mess up the Apps Store for Apple TV, the platform would survive, just like the Mac Platform survived the terrible CEO Steve Jobs hired from Pepsi.

24 corrector { 09.14.08 at 7:20 am }

The chart looks wrong.

“n the month since Apple opened an online software clearinghouse called the App Store, users have downloaded more than 60 million programs for the iPhone, Chief Executive Steve Jobs said in an interview at Apple’s headquarters. While most of those applications were free, Apple sold an average of $1 million a day in applications for a total of about $30 million in sales over the month, Mr. Jobs said.”

That means that 60 million apps were downloaded in the first month.

25 App Store groeit sneller dan iTunes Music Store > Nieuws > iPhoneclub.nl { 09.14.08 at 10:09 am }

[...] Via: Roughly Drafted [...]

26 iPhone Apps Store Growing Twice as Fast as iTunes Music « Recycleosphere { 09.14.08 at 2:02 pm }

[...] Apps Store Growing Twice as Fast as iTunes Music iPhone Apps Store Growing Twice as Fast as iTunes Music: “Daniel Eran Dilger Everyone was impressed last month when Apple announced moving 30 million [...]

27 iPhone Apps Downloaded Twice As Often As Songs { 09.14.08 at 5:52 pm }

[...] There may only be over 12 million iPhones in the wild, but that hasn’t stopped iTunes users from downloading more than twice as many apps as songs during the store’s first two months of availability, according to a report. [...]

28 iPhone Apps Downloaded Twice As Often As Songs | aboutCREATION { 09.14.08 at 6:15 pm }

[...] There may only be over 12 million iPhones in the wild, but that hasn’t stopped iTunes users from downloading more than twice as many apps as songs during the store’s first two months of availability, according to a report. [...]

29 iPhone Apps Downloaded Twice As Often As Songs  »TechAddress { 09.14.08 at 6:30 pm }

[...] There may only be over 12 million iPhones in the wild, but that hasn’t stopped iTunes users from downloading more than twice as many apps as songs during the store’s first two months of availability, according to a report. [...]

30 designguy { 09.14.08 at 7:25 pm }

@ The Mad Hatter

“These are all new and expanding markets that demand customized solutions, else they will be leveled by their competitors feature sets.”

You misunderstand me, apologies for not being more transparent. When I stated the above quote, I was not implying that Apple’s competition would outperform, that would just be amusing.
I was providing a valid point that if Apple does not open the Apple TV as a development platform, competition will move in to ensure their own dominance. While I know this is no true threat to the Apple Empire, I would like to see them take the first step in this arena rather than wait for everyone else.

Simply put, Apple needs to open the rest of their closed ecosystem to development soon.

31 iPhone App Downloads to Hit 1 Billion Mark Faster Than Songs Did | about ICT { 09.14.08 at 8:39 pm }

[...] There may only be over 12 million iPhones in the wild, but that hasn’t stopped iTunes users from downloading more than twice as many apps as songs during the store’s first two months of availability, according to a report. [...]

32 iPhone App Downloads to Hit 1 Billion Mark Faster Than Songs Did | aboutCREATION { 09.14.08 at 9:17 pm }

[...] There may only be over 12 million iPhones in the wild, but that hasn’t stopped iTunes users from downloading more than twice as many apps as songs during the store’s first two months of availability, according to a report. [...]

33 TechCrunch en français » Un milliard d’applications téléchargées depuis l’iPhone Apps store d’ici 2009 { 09.15.08 at 12:00 am }

[...] Il n’y a peut être que 12 millions d’iphones dans le monde mais cela n’a a pas empêché les utilisateurs d’d’Itunes de télécharger deux fois plus d’applications que de chansons durant les deux premiers mois de lancement du iPhone app store, selon ce rapport. [...]

34 iPhone Apps Store Expected to Hit 1 Billion Downloads! | Average Tech { 09.15.08 at 12:35 am }

[...] that users have now downloaded over 100 million apps from their new iTunes app store, Now Blogger Daniel Dilger is pectulating that Apple will hit the 1 Billion mark faster than their songs [...]

35 corrector { 09.15.08 at 1:57 am }

I suggest taking accurate citations of what Jobs or any other Apple representative said and make the corrected chart, not the distorted one
1. On July 14th there were 10 million downloads total – see Apple press-release
http://www.apple.com/pr/library/2008/07/14appstore.html
2. On August 11th there were 60 million downloads total – see Steve Jobs’ speech
http://www.engadget.com/2008/08/11/jobs-60-million-iphone-apps-downloaded-confirms-kill-switch/
3. On September 9th there were 100 million downloads total – see Apple News for that number
http://www.apple.com/hotnews/

Please note that neither 70 million downloads nor $70 million in revenue have been mentioned.

Here is the corrected chart
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3087/2858158885_1d413093f1_m.jpg

36 De Web Times - Blogs » iPhone Apps Store Growing Twice as Fast as iTunes Music { 09.15.08 at 3:22 am }

[...] more [...]

37 iPhone Apps Store Expected to Hit 1 Billion Downloads! » iPhoneOverdose.com { 09.15.08 at 3:22 am }

[...] that users have now downloaded over 100 million apps from their new iTunes app store, Now Blogger Daniel Dilger is pectulating that Apple will hit the 1 Billion mark faster than their songs [...]

38 TechCrunch Japanese アーカイブ » iPhoneアプリのダウンロードは音楽より早く10億に { 09.15.08 at 4:12 am }

[...] 世界中で使われているiPhoneはたったの1200万台だが、そのApp Storeの発足後2か月でiTuneのユーザがアプリケーションをダウンロードした数は音楽のダウンロード曲数の倍以上だ。この記事がそう言っている。 [...]

39 iPhone App Downloads to Hit 1 Billion Mark Faster Than Songs Did » The Scripts Zone { 09.15.08 at 7:29 am }

[...] There may only be over 12 million iPhones in the wild, but that hasn’t stopped iTunes users from downloading more than twice as many apps as songs during the store’s first two months of availability, according to a report. [...]

40 The iPhone App Store Surpasses has reached an Impressive 100M Downloads | Viraload { 09.15.08 at 9:45 am }

[...] 1B download by next year according to an analysis by Daniel Eran Dilger and written in a  post  iPhone Apps Store Growing Twice as Fast as iTunes Music.  The impact on the iPhone is huge in terms of the market for applications and revenues able to be [...]

41 iPhone App Downloads to Hit 1 Billion Mark Faster Than Songs Did | Latest Technology News - Business News And Expert Advice { 09.15.08 at 10:29 am }

[...] There may only be over 12 million iPhones in the wild, but that hasn’t stopped iTunes users from downloading more than twice as many apps as songs during the store’s first two months of availability, according to a report. [...]

42 iPhone App Downloads to Hit 1 Billion Mark Faster Than Songs Did | Tech News And Social Networking { 09.15.08 at 10:31 am }

[...] There may only be over 12 million iPhones in the wild, but that hasn’t stopped iTunes users from downloading more than twice as many apps as songs during the store’s first two months of availability, according to a report. [...]

43 L’App Store deux fois plus fort qu’iTunes Music Store | traffic-internet.net { 09.15.08 at 1:18 pm }

[...] Cupertino, qui a écoulé plus de 12 millions d’iPhone dans le monde, annonce qu’elle a dépassé les 100 millions de téléchargements sur l’App Store, pour un chiffre d’affaires de 70 millions de [...]

44 WIRELESS « Daily Marauder { 09.15.08 at 8:34 pm }

[...] twice as many apps as songs during the store’s first two months of availability, according to a report. (http://www.techcrunch.com/2008/09/14/iphone-apps-downloaded-twice-as-often-as-songs [...]

45 App Store on track to do a billion items by 2009 | Apple News { 09.15.08 at 9:27 pm }

[...] read that right — it took the iTunes Store a few years, but as Roughly Drafted has calculated, Apple’s App Store is on track, even whether growth stops right now, to hit a billion apps [...]

46 PreGameLobby - App Store on track to do a BILLION items by 2009 { 09.15.08 at 11:28 pm }

[...] do a BILLION items by 2009 You read that right — it took the iTunes Store a few years, but as Roughly Drafted has calculated, Apple’s App Store is on track, even if growth stops right now, to hit a billion apps served up by [...]

47 Banned iPhone Apps and the John Gruber Podcaster Defense — RoughlyDrafted Magazine { 09.16.08 at 1:51 am }

[...] iPhone Apps Store Growing Twice as Fast as iTunes Music How Apple Is Changing the PC Software World… Back [...]

48 Un milliard d’applications téléchargées depuis l’iPhone Apps store d’ici 2009 { 09.16.08 at 3:07 am }

[...] Il n’y a peut être que 12 millions d’iphones dans le monde mais cela n’a a pas empêché les utilisateurs d’ITunes de télécharger deux fois plus d’applications que de chansons durant les deux premiers mois de lancement du iPhone app store, selon ce rapport. [...]

49 Apple iPhone App Review - App Store on track to do a billion items by 2009 | iFones.com Apple iPhone 3G News { 09.16.08 at 3:33 am }

[...] read that right — it took the iTunes Store a few years, but as Roughly Drafted has calculated, Apple’s App Store is on track, even if growth stops right now, to hit a billion apps served [...]

50 How Apple Is Changing the PC Software World… Back — RoughlyDrafted Magazine { 09.16.08 at 5:34 am }

[...] and the New Software Market How Apple Is Changing the PC Software World… Back iPhone Apps Store Growing Twice as Fast as iTunes Music The Other iPhone Apps Store SDK 3.3.3: The iPhone Podcaster Surprise Myth Banned iPhone Apps and [...]

51 Zahlengarten II: iPhone-Apps “verkaufen” sich schneller als Songs { 09.16.08 at 5:49 am }

[...] techcrunch, roughlydrafted, apple var disqus_url = [...]

52 App Store on track to do a billion items by 2009 | Apple@CooOne { 09.16.08 at 9:48 am }

[...] read that right — it took the iTunes Store a few years, but as Roughly Drafted has calculated, Apple’s App Store is on track, even if growth stops right now, to hit a billion apps served [...]

53 PodcasterGate: The Great App Rejection Debate | The iPhone Blog { 09.16.08 at 3:01 pm }

[...] the App Store is growing twice as fast as iTunes Music (though starting from zero is an easy way to generate an opening curve), and may well hit a billion [...]

54 PodcasterGate: The Great App Rejection Debate | iPhone The Solution 3G { 09.16.08 at 3:37 pm }

[...] the App Store is growing twice as fast as iTunes Music (though starting from zero is an easy way to generate an opening curve), and may well hit a billion [...]

55 PodcasterGate: The Great App Rejection Debate - iPhone Newswire { 09.16.08 at 8:23 pm }

[...] the App Store is growing twice as fast as iTunes Music (though starting from zero is an easy way to generate an opening curve), and may well hit a billion [...]

56 iPhone Apps Store Growing Twice as Fast as iTunes Music | Blog del Troubleshooting.com { 09.17.08 at 1:10 pm }

[...] iPhone Apps Store Growing Twice as Fast as iTunes Music: “Daniel Eran Dilger Everyone was impressed last month when Apple announced moving 30 million downloads through the new iPhone Apps Store, bringing in $30 million of revenue (or a million dollars per day). Well, growth more than doubled this month, bringing a total of 100 million downloads (and somewhere around another $70 million of software revenue). […]“ [...]

57 The Other iPhone Apps Store — RoughlyDrafted Magazine { 09.18.08 at 5:27 am }

[...] and the New Software Market How Apple Is Changing the PC Software World… Back iPhone Apps Store Growing Twice as Fast as iTunes Music The Other iPhone Apps Store SDK 3.3.3: The iPhone Podcaster Surprise Myth Banned iPhone Apps and [...]

58 SDK 3.3.3: The iPhone Podcaster Surprise Myth — RoughlyDrafted Magazine { 09.18.08 at 5:27 am }

[...] and the New Software Market How Apple Is Changing the PC Software World… Back iPhone Apps Store Growing Twice as Fast as iTunes Music The Other iPhone Apps Store SDK 3.3.3: The iPhone Podcaster Surprise Myth Banned iPhone Apps and [...]

59 Banned iPhone Apps: The Podcaster Situation — RoughlyDrafted Magazine { 09.18.08 at 5:28 am }

[...] and the New Software Market How Apple Is Changing the PC Software World… Back iPhone Apps Store Growing Twice as Fast as iTunes Music The Other iPhone Apps Store SDK 3.3.3: The iPhone Podcaster Surprise Myth Banned iPhone Apps and [...]

60 Apple iPhone Apps - App Store on track to do a billion items by 2009 | iFones.com Apple iPhone 3G News { 09.19.08 at 2:43 am }

[...] read that right — it took the iTunes Store a few years, but as Roughly Drafted has calculated, Apple’s App Store is on track, even if growth stops right now, to hit a billion apps served [...]

61 » Apple TV as an Extension of the iPhone Platform « Laaker.com - Micah Laaker { 09.27.08 at 7:46 pm }

[...] $30 million was earned in the first month of the App Store’s release, with $70 million more the following month. Six million total Apple TV units are predicted to be in homes by end of 2008 compared to the 12 [...]

62 Alfabetic » Blog Archive » Se duplican las descargas de aplicaciones para iPhone, y alcanzan la tasa de descargas de canciones { 09.28.08 at 10:32 am }

[...] acuerdo a un informe, debe haber más de 12 millones de iPhones en el mundo, pero eso no logró evitar que los usuarios [...]

63 iPhone Apps Selling Faster than iTunes « iStumbled { 10.03.08 at 2:39 am }

[...] number of iTunes downloaded by iPod users in the first two months of availability, according to a report. The first generation iPhones launched last year have sold about 6 million units so far. The new [...]

64 Dale Larson » Blog Archive » Apps are the new Singles: Betting on AppStore Revenue { 11.04.08 at 3:59 am }

[...] 12-Sep-08 iPhone Apps Store Growing Twice as Fast as iTunes Music [...]

65 iPhone App Downloads to Hit 1 Billion Mark Faster Than Songs Did | Zensible { 12.20.08 at 5:12 pm }

[...] There may only be over 12 million iPhones in the wild, but that hasn’t stopped iTunes users from downloading more than twice as many apps as songs during the store’s first two months of availability, according to a report. [...]

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