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Myths of Snow Leopard 6: Apple is Out of Ideas!

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Daniel Eran Dilger
Apple’s limited comments on Snow Leopard, the next version of Mac OS X due in about a year, have opened the playing field for rampant speculation. Here’s a look at a series of myths that have developed around the upcoming release. The sixth myth of Snow Leopard:

Snow Leopard indicates Apple is out of ideas for new applications and features.


Windows Enthusiasts have worked hard to remain unimpressed with Apple. Despite selling a small minority of the entire world’s sum total of servers, desktops, and laptop systems, the company has maintained a profile larger that it seemingly should. How is it that nobody knows much about new models from HP or Dell, or new software feature in Vista, but everyone hears about the latest products from Apple?

In part, it’s because Apple more effectively markets its products. Critics argue that Apple is nothing but a smoke and mirrors marketing company. In ridicule of Mac users, those critics have appropriated the term “Reality Distortion Field,” which was originally used by Bud Tribble in the early 80s to describe Steve Jobs’ charismatic ability to inspire engineers to take on seemingly impossible tasks.

However, in the lexicon of Apple’s critics, RDF is an evil mind control force field that causes people to desire products that are nothing special. Is that an accurate portrayal of reality, and is Snow Leopard yet another example of expertly marketed snake oil?

Folklore.org: Macintosh Stories: Reality Distortion Field

Reality Distortion, Distortion, Distortion.
Is Jobs bamboozling Mac users into buying an operating system that wastes their time with malware scans (and viral outbreaks) that exist because the software was designed without any regard for basic security? Has he hoodwinked the company’s customers into buying poorly designed computers that appear to be cheap but only last for a year or two before becoming ewaste junk?

Has he led the “faithful” on a wild goose chase that made a lot of promises about technologies (such as, say, a database file system) that were never actually delivered? Has he championed a variety of worthless ideas for poorly conceived products that absorbed billions of dollars in development investments by outside companies, only to find those product visions meet with yawns in the market place?

Wait: malware, ewaste, vaporware, and atrocious products… that doesn’t sound like Steve Jobs and Apple, but rather Bill Gates, Steve Ballmer, and Microsoft. What is particularly interesting is that Jobs hasn’t been writing books where he outlines his grand view of the road ahead and gives himself credit for predictions through revision editing. Instead, Jobs has frequently diverted fawning attention from fans to his employees.

In his WWDC keynote this year, Jobs didn’t announce that he had invented the iPhone 3G on his whiteboard as a solo effort. Instead he had Apple’s iPhone engineers stand up for a round of applause. Earlier, Jobs described himself as being privileged to be able to see the rise of a series of pivotal platforms, from the original Apple II to the Macintosh to the iPhone.

And so, in addition to the RDF surrounding Jobs that results in the development of clever products, there is an equally strong RDF that protects Microsoft’s naked emperor absurdity from being exposed and a third RDF that emanates from the tech media that suggests that Jobs’ RDF and Microsoft’s RDF are actually both reversed, making Jobs the charlatan and Microsoft the historical bastion of exceptional engineering.

 Wp-Content Uploads 2008 04 200804010234

The Unavoidable Malware Myth: Why Apple Won’t Inherit Microsoft’s Malware Crown
Ten Myths of Leopard: 10 Leopard is a Vista Knockoff!
Windows Vista, 7, and Singularity: The New Copland, Gershwin & Taligent
1990-1995: Microsoft’s Yellow Road to Cairo
CES: Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas

Is Jobs’ Apple Out of Ideas?
Following his brush with cancer in 2003, Jobs is clearly happy to be alive and fully aware of his own fragility. That adversity appears to have emboldened Jobs to take big risks. Last fall, Apple could have kept prices higher on its iPhone and iPod touch, and would have likely seen robust sales and profits anyway. This year, Apple again targeted the wider market rather than continuing to sell the iPhone in the $400 and up range, where it certainly could have continued to sell.

Snow Leopard could have delivered a predictable set of fancifully named, customer facing features. Apple could have glossed over architectural problems with glitzy, egregious fluff in the same way Microsoft tried to skirt around major performance problems in Vista related to slow waking from sleep by creating a reference design for a secondary, small LCD display on the lid of PC laptops to provide difficult to navigate access to one’s email and other information in place of just opening the laptop and using it as it should work.

But Apple isn’t out of ideas. The company laid out a cohesive strategy for strengthening Snow Leopard’s performance and its suitability for running the next generation of software on the next generation of hardware. Clearly, Apple is being led by engineers, not just clever marketers.

In fact, all of the advancements related to Snow Leopard, from the publicly advertised OpenCL and Grand Central to the open secrets of CUPS and LLVM to the fully secret, incremental advances that have not yet been published are all examples of strong, visionary, well-planned engineering.

The are not ideas that flowed directly from Jobs, they are the result of Apple’s continuing investment in enabling technologies. When viewed within context of technology cross pollination with the iPhone, Apple’s Pro Apps, its consumer app suites, and its expanding role in online subscription software, it’s clear Apple is not running short of ideas. As for Snow Leopard, there’s still a lot to be revealed.

WWDC 2008: New in Mac OS X Snow Leopard
Myths of Snow Leopard 1: PowerPC Support — RoughlyDrafted Magazine
Myths of Snow Leopard 2: 32-bit Support
Myths of Snow Leopard 3: Mac Sidelined for iPhone
Myths of Snow Leopard 4: Exchange is the Only New Feature!
Myths of Snow Leopard 5: No Carbon!
Myths of Snow Leopard 6: Apple is Out of Ideas!

Cocoa for Windows + Flash Killer = SproutCore
Apple’s other open secret: the LLVM Complier

Ten Big New Features in Mac OS X Snow Leopard

If there aren’t any major new marketing features in Snow Leopard, will Apple be forced to give it away for free? That’s the next myth.

I really like to hear from readers. Comment in the Forum or email me with your ideas.

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41 comments

1 John Muir { 06.27.08 at 8:44 am }

The free 10.6 rumour is the most irritating of all, not least because it’s believed in some places people should really know better. 10.1 – the last free major release of OS X they like to compare to – was a historical relic, a necessary mass-optimisation of 10.0 which was itself something of a public beta.

Ever since 10.2, things have been advanced enough to warrant each new version to carry the $129 price tag. Snow Leopard will too.

Apple know the early adopters (like me and most of you) will grab it anyway, eager to discover every altered nuance and itching not be left on last year’s tech. The rest of the Mac userbase will get it automatically with their new hardware, or on existing machines may let it pass them by. Many millions are still on Tiger after all. There’s a persistent base of holdouts on every one of Steve Jobs’s occasional pie charts who still hold on to 10.3 and less.

Unlike certain other platforms where old baggage lingers forever and the slowest always get to set the pace, Mac OS X has no such worries. 10.6 should be a major release as worthy as 10.5 or 10.4 to the name. If what we’re hearing is true, 10.6 is almost an OS XI from an architectural view!

2 stefn { 06.27.08 at 10:07 am }

Having been a Mac owner during the dark days of the nineties, I’m simply delighted that the iPod and iPhone will finance the continued development of the OS in perpetuity. OSX is Apple’s golden goose; the gadgets are the golden eggs.

3 John Muir { 06.27.08 at 10:16 am }

@stefn

That was right back when the iPod was just a gadget, instead of a whole OS X client.

I’d say these days, the relationship is much more symbiotic. Look at QuickTime X to see some proof for that.

OS X made the iPhone possible. The iPhone feeds OS X both financially and in feature demands. OS X matures further still as a desktop and a handheld platform par excellence. What’s not to like!

To think that this is what Apple bought when they snatched NeXT. It’s beginning to eclipse IBM’s mishap with Microsoft and CP/M as the greatest steal in history.

4 Berend Schotanus { 06.27.08 at 11:32 am }

“in the lexicon of Apple’s critics, RDF is an evil mind control force”
and right so :-)

To really understand Apple’s critics: read Harry Potter and incorporate the concept of “Muggles”. It is a waste of time to try and explain magic to non magic people.

As to Apple’s new ideas: my impression is that Apple is suffering severe anorexia (in a good sense). I am impressed with the fact Snow Leopard is so much lighter than Leopard. Apple is a champion in portability. With their Macbook Air they gained a lot of knowledge about the market and how much people are prepared to pay for gadget a few ounces lighter.
Making Snow Leopard lighter is coherent with investment in lighter more energy efficient chips. I wouldn’t be surprised if Apple comes soon with a whole range of more portable computers. While the best move of the competition – wow oh wow – is offering XP a little longer for Eee PC.

5 Berend Schotanus { 06.27.08 at 11:38 am }

@John

Too bad I’ll have to say farewell to my iMac G5, but I guess you’re absolutely right: the temptation of the new OS is there!

6 hylas { 06.27.08 at 1:42 pm }

I also went through those “dark days” in the 90s.
When I saw this:

http://www.digitalmx.com/john/pics/license.JPG

I knew things would get better.

10.6.x will be a turning point where everything settles to a “known state”. Software that should run across multiple releases, dispensing with the backwards compatible mess.
This departure from feature creep is what “code reviews” are all about (IMHO), any UNIX distribution worth running has these (UNICOS/MP, IRIX, HP-UX, SunOS and Solaris, AIX and the BSDs), I hoped they would do this. This makes for the beginning of a serious distro, the kind of OS that has competent people making good decisions.
What a concept.

7 beanie { 06.27.08 at 2:26 pm }

So if Macs just work and hardware is superior how come Apple Genius’s are so busy? You would think that they would be sitting around without anything to do like the Maytag Repairman.

Apple has openings for Mac Genius’s in various cities listed on dice.com. The job ad list three qualifications:

Technical guru status required.
Mac certification preferred but not required.
Technical training + retail experience is preferred.

You do not even need to be Mac certified to qualify!
So the Apple Genius you talk to might not be a genius afterall. And why do you need to talk to one since Macs just work?

8 MichaelT { 06.27.08 at 2:39 pm }

beanie, what are you talking about? I believe the topic was Snow Leopard?

9 lmasanti { 06.27.08 at 3:33 pm }

quote:
“You do not even need to be Mac certified to qualify!”

If you are already “Mac certified” they put just to work.
If not, they give you the necessary trainnig.
Is this so strange?

10 mmbossman { 06.27.08 at 4:44 pm }

beanie;

Mac Geniuses are so busy because they service products that sometimes fail (like all products do). The phrase “They just work” was marketing directed at how easy the software and hardware are to use, and how things work together; when you upgrade your operating system, you don’t have to go searching for a dozen drivers for third party peripherals *cough*Vista*cough. All products have a failure rate, but if you look at customer satisfaction surveys (there was one in Macworld around 6 months ago, IIRC), when a Mac does fail, somewhere around 80% of customers were pleased or very pleased with the support they received. That type of customer satisfaction is very hard to find these days.

Apple has not only been labeled as having a RDF, but as being so full of hubris that the company will soon collapse upon itself. No one seems to know the difference between vanity and pride. A vain company thinks their products are perfect, but a proud company knows their products can/do fail, and want to provide the best support for their customers when it happens. If you cannot understand this, you can just go back to spouting sales “data” for the Zune from Walmart.com

11 gus2000 { 06.27.08 at 6:15 pm }

RDF = RoughlyDrafted Forums
RDF = Reality Distortion Field

COINCIDENCE?!??

12 John Muir { 06.27.08 at 6:32 pm }

@gus2000

Oi, quiet down you!

RDM is a good source of predictions which – unlike those in the fawning tech press – come true much more often than not.

Has something to do with informed analysis and insight into clear tech trends. Plus the whole independence from a Redmond ad budget and general integrity thing too. Can’t beat that.

13 webheads { 06.27.08 at 6:43 pm }

“So if Macs just work and hardware is superior how come Apple Genius’s are so busy? You would think that they would be sitting around without anything to do like the Maytag Repairman.

Apple has openings for Mac Genius’s in various cities listed on dice.com. The job ad list three qualifications:

Technical guru status required.
Mac certification preferred but not required.
Technical training + retail experience is preferred.

You do not even need to be Mac certified to qualify!
So the Apple Genius you talk to might not be a genius afterall. And why do you need to talk to one since Macs just work?”

Apparently you are unaware of what a Mac Genius does. Not all of them are repair technicians, many just teach customers how to use their Apple products and software better. I defy you to show me a retail outlet that has hundreds of stores world wide where you can go and ask a Microsoft and PC genius for assistance using their products, oh yea … and this service has to be free.

The Mac Genius is really an excellent feature about the apple stores, yes Macs just work but there is such a huge array of products and services and software from Apple now, it’s very nice to have some free support at your local Apple store when you need it. When Microsoft and Dell start offering this kind of service then maybe your sarcasm will be better placed.

14 GregA { 06.28.08 at 2:26 am }

The more I hear about 10.6, the more it feels like the switch from PPC to Intel.

I mean: Apple is doing something significant under the hood, that’s going to set it up for the future, but they’re going to make it look like nothing has changed to the average punter (as much as they can).

That bodes well for the future. It also might indicate just how BIG the changes are – big enough that Apple has decided to hide it because people might think the jump is too big.

I wonder if that makes sense!

ps. I think Apple will charge for 10.6. But they’ll actually tell people that they don’t need to upgrade.

pps. Hey, a year or so after 10.6 and we’ll see 2 big OS releases – Windows 7 and OSX.7.

15 David Dennis { 06.28.08 at 12:20 pm }

Daniel, when I saw that “Snow Leopard Ultimate” image at the top of the screen, I nearly lost my lunch. A little too authentic looking, perhaps?

Beanie, all hard drives eventually fail, all motherboards eventually blow up, etc. The Genius Bar is devoted to fixing those problems. In my experience, Mac hardware has been excellent with few problems, but Apple is not a magically perfect world.

However, one on one training is also popular, and that’s designed to help people do more with their machines. It’s a great credit to Apple that they do this, since it’s time consuming and you get a great deal at a very reasonable price.

PC users would definitely benefit from a similar service but I think it would be a lot more difficult to do. Apple’s “we do the whole widget” worldview makes it a lot easier.

D

16 OlsonBW { 06.28.08 at 12:21 pm }

The reason that iPhones have dropped it price is for ONE reason only.

1) Apple did NOT want everyone to buy an iPhone in the beginning. SHOCKING but true. Apple wanted to ramp up production at their pace not anyone else’s. Too many sales too fast increases costs and reduces quality. Now that Apple is able to supply them in both quality and quantity they are ready for mass production.

1a (not 2). 3G and GPS. Steve Jobs wanted these two things in from the beginning and was not happy that battery life was as bad as it was with those two built into the original iPhone. Not that the OS X iPhone software side (as Google pointed out) does a tremendously better job of power management PLUS the 3G chips are much smaller and use less power, and Apple decided wisely to combine GPS/cell/hotspots to not just triangulate but (what is the 9 way version of this called?) to get the best of all worlds and better than anything on their own, precise iPhone location was ready.

MacBookAir – See 1) post above about iPhone. Literally this is as simple as it gets and most people just don’t see or understand this. There is nothing more to it than that.

17 OlsonBW { 06.28.08 at 12:37 pm }

“Snow Leopard indicates Apple is out of ideas for new applications and features.”

This article is correct. Steve Jobs is showing TREMENDOUS patience, something he didn’t have 20 years go, with Mac OS X. At this rate SJ will be in his 80s before he starts to see where he wants OS X.

Where he wants OS X is a place where nobody today would recognize a computer unless they watched StarTrek Next Generation. I’m sure Steve Jobs is one of the people who laughed hardest when Scotty from the Original StarTrek picked up the Apple mouse and tried to speak into it to get the Mac to do what he wanted.

So why not just roll it out? Did you notice the hissy fit that people through moving from OS 9 to Mac OS X? That was an extremely small change. Plus hardware just isn’t ready for it.

Do I have any inside on this? No. But if you think that redoing NextStep from the 80s is where Steve Jobs wanted to be now then I don’t think you know Steve Jobs. I don’t personally either but innovation is what he lives for and dreams of.

He isn’t happy with the status quo.

So why Snow Leopard?

Apple has been soooo busy just trying to get NextStep up and running on PowerPC then Intel (yes OS X has been running on Intel for over six years now) and then engineers were borrowed for the iPod and then the iPhone.

While Apple has done its best to keep OS X small and bug free. There just aren’t enough people to work on that and get everything else done at the same time. So Steve Jobs called a time out, mostly, to let internal employees shrink and debug and 3rd party developers catch up some.

It’s actually the latter that is the most important part of all this. It’s developers that are struggling to keep up even more than Apple engineers.

This is not the best example but a very good one. Delicious Software (to my knowledge) has only one program. Delicious Library.

With all the changes in Mac OS X in the last few years Wil Shipley, who has been developing NextStep and OS X apps for YEARS, wasn’t able to introduce all the different technologies he wanted to into Delicious Software in what he and most other people would consider a reasonable time frame.

After making lots of changes he had to rip out quite a few of them and start completely over in many areas of the app. Other than the interface that people see, not much else exists from the original version. The hardest part was making it compatible, actually, upgradable from version 1 to version 2. Less hard but much more time consuming was starting over and starting over and starting over using many different and changing technologies inside of OS X.

My guess is that Wil Shipley is a little exhausted and is thanking Apple for taking a breather to stop and clean up and shrink OS X. I’m sure many other developers are too that are trying to catch up.

And then there is the native iPhone versions of their apps. I hear them screaming with delight and more nights of less sleep as they are excited but also under a lot of pressure to get their apps ready for iPhone day.

Sorry developers, no sleep for you.

18 John Muir { 06.28.08 at 12:43 pm }

@OlsonBW

Wil Shipley’s firm is Delicious Monster. And he’s actually had several of his employees drawn away from him by Apple over the years. This is a big deal as he only likes to have two of them at a time along with himself.

19 OlsonBW { 06.28.08 at 12:49 pm }

@JohnMuir

Yes I realize that what you are saying but that doesn’t change anything I commented on. They still to my knowledge have one product. Even with these people there it still would have taken a lot longer than they would have liked with all the changes in OS X. The only change would be to note that Apple was stealing his talent.

20 People think that Snow Leopard is a result of Apple being out of ideas « Dmtherob’s Weblog { 06.28.08 at 1:36 pm }

[...] clipped from http://www.roughlydrafted.com [...]

21 dicklacara { 06.28.08 at 2:09 pm }

@David Dennis

“Daniel, when I saw that “Snow Leopard Ultimate” image at the top of the screen, I nearly lost my lunch. A little too authentic looking, perhaps?”

Microsoft packaging makes me visualize how an Elephant Condom might be packaged!

22 lmasanti { 06.28.08 at 8:04 pm }

quote:
“RDM is a good source of predictions which – unlike those in the fawning tech press – come true much more often than not.”

Hey, he was speaking of the Forums (RDF!).
“We” are the ones with the Reality Distorsion Field!

23 John Muir { 06.28.08 at 8:21 pm }

@lmasanti

Oh, well, when you put it that way!

24 Chrispy { 06.28.08 at 9:12 pm }

“So if Macs just work and hardware is superior how come Apple Genius’s are so busy? You would think that they would be sitting around without anything to do like the Maytag Repairman.”

Had to chuckle at this as it reminded me of a few years back when I was waiting in line at the Genius Bar and the person in front of me was lugging in a Windows box. Kinda pissed me off at first thinking this should just be for Apple related stuff but after the Genius helped the person fix their machine I walked out of there kinda proud.

Then I remembered most of my Mac friends are pretty proficient on Windows as well (how hard is it to remember back 5 years how things were done then to fix the Windows of today?).

25 lmasanti { 06.29.08 at 12:09 am }

quote:
“Had to chuckle at this as it reminded me of a few years back when I was waiting in line at the Genius Bar and the person in front of me was lugging in a Windows box.”

Maybe this guy has a problem with iTunes or QuickTime for Windows!

26 thyl { 06.29.08 at 1:15 pm }

Err, imho the whole industry is somewhat out of ideas. The last thing really revolutionary and showing a paradigmatic change was NeXTSTEP (if I count hhtp as “NeXTSTEP related” ;-)).

I concur with OlsonBW that Apple has wasted much time in just making NeXTSTEP a better MacOS, though this evidently was necessary.

If, if, if GrandCentral would turn out to be some kind of automatically threading compiler, thus finally taking the burden of threading from the developpers, I would say that this be such revolutionary paradigmatic change again. Otherwise, I have been somewhat disappointed with Software in the last decade.

27 John Muir { 06.29.08 at 5:10 pm }

@thyl

An interesting comparison is to compare the progress of software on the desktop to the progress of website design during the same period.

I think that something which holds software back in general is that few people are able to contribute to it directly. Web design seems to have really opened up the creative community, at least to another group of skills.

Ultimately, it should be possible for any user with the interest and the grasp of a particular problem they want to solve, to be able to make their own solution. This is the ideal you see in the movies where someone just asks a computer the answer to their question, or when combining program pieces becomes as easy as playing games…

We’re still early on in this computer stuff you know. Give it time. Decades upon decades of innovation still to come should really push the boundaries. Once you start talking in centuries, well, the old Arthur C. Clarke line about magic comes right into play.

I think Apple will be considered a significant actor when it’s possible to look back on all this from a future perspective. And something tells me they’re far from out of ideas.

28 lmasanti { 06.29.08 at 5:16 pm }

quote:
“or when combining program pieces becomes as easy as playing games…

We’re still early on in this computer stuff you know. Give it time.”

To a small extend, Automator let you do this in a simple and restricted environment.

29 John Muir { 06.29.08 at 5:19 pm }

@lmasanti

Indeed, that’s why I use it instead of learning scripts. Quicksilver also interested me for a while too.

30 lmasanti { 06.29.08 at 5:21 pm }

On lack of ideas… Now Windows “should make multicore programming easy”… just 15 after Grand Central was announced.

From Daring Fireball:
“Microsoft take the time and effort to re-architect Windows from the ground-up, asks Avie Tevanian’s opinion:

I asked Mr. Tevanian if he thought Microsoft could pull off a similar switch.

“Perhaps, but I don’t know if it has the intestinal fortitude,” he said, “At Apple, we had to. It was a matter of survival.”

Windows Could Use a Rush of Fresh Air

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/29/technology/29digi.html?adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1214768892-oH7z+T8dVmHvCtasKTTukQ

31 lmasanti { 06.29.08 at 6:00 pm }

@John Muir

In a similar sense, but a little deep in the heart of programmers, the bunch of “higher level” frameworks, like SproutCore, Ruby on Rails and the APIs delivered by Facebook et al. (“higher” in comparison to the OS’ APIs) are in the same direction: they allow doing less work to get greater results.

32 Chrispy { 06.29.08 at 10:40 pm }

quote:
“Had to chuckle at this as it reminded me of a few years back when I was waiting in line at the Genius Bar and the person in front of me was lugging in a Windows box.”

Maybe this guy has a problem with iTunes or QuickTime for Windows!
——–
Nope, I was sitting right next to them as he was working on it. Had something to do with not booting up right.

33 lmasanti { 06.30.08 at 1:30 am }

quote:
“Nope, I was sitting right next to them as he was working on it. Had something to do with not booting up right.”

Maybe in the PC store next door there weren’t chairs.

34 John Muir { 06.30.08 at 9:49 am }

@lmasanti

A friend of mine does travelling tech support, quite a lot of it for home users. He doesn’t even know how to configure Macs. No one in their right mind would pay his company’s fees when they can get their fix for free at the Genius Bar.

He’s shoulder deep in XP and Vista configuration nightmares every working day. Let’s say there’s money aplenty to be made from that ongoing user nightmare.

The other side of his duties is 802.11. I showed him my AirPort Extreme recently. He’d never fiddled with one of those before either… “Where’s the damn web page?”

35 lmasanti { 06.30.08 at 11:01 am }

quote:
“The other side of his duties is 802.11. I showed him my AirPort Extreme recently. He’d never fiddled with one of those before either… “Where’s the damn web page?””

I do remember an Ars Technica’s (a truly good site) comparison that “included” it because of users’ complains. It was the best of the bunch… but the only thing that they claim “not good” was that, a short distances, reception was not great.
What’s the meaning of wireless if you are at “short distance” (a.k.a. connect with a cable)?

36 John Muir { 06.30.08 at 12:17 pm }

@lmasanti

Ars are pretty competent, but I can’t say I’ve ever seen my AirPort Extreme behave like they reported. I have a Mac mini sitting literally right under it and there’s no trouble with its reception (although I do actually use Ethernet in preference, to keep the network clear for when I do lots of over the air file transfers to that mini, as it’s hooked up as my household server). As for long range signal strength, it reaches across the street and penetrates the “Faraday cage” of the garaged car too. Definitely stronger than the neighbours’ .g gear. No one else has .n yet nearby.

Daniel did a much more in depth series on AirPort Extreme and Time Capsule over at AppleInsider some months back in fact. (They are very similar hardware, and I’ve been using my Extreme for Time Machine backups for months now.)

My PC networking friend meanwhile has a little generic .g router of his own. When he first got it, I had my PowerBook with me and asked if I could join his network. He started reciting “D0 3E 2B …” and I had to stop him. “WTF?” He was using WEP “because it’s more reliable than WPA” and preferred remembering a maddening hex code instead of a password.

I managed to convince him out of that, fortunately.

Boy. You get some serious training as a Windows network troubleshooter!

37 lmasanti { 06.30.08 at 12:55 pm }

quote:
“Boy. You get some serious training as a Windows network troubleshooter!”

I live on a Mac. My sister lives on a PC.
She says “he has his brain damaged” because I do not know anything of that crap.
(And I’m the Engineer and she is the MBA!)

38 Peter { 06.30.08 at 7:29 pm }

It’s nice to hear, read, and see Apple increasingly described as an engineering firm within the “Halo Effect” realm. The end-user products naturally garner the deserved accolades — design aesthetic, ease of use, ergonomic attention, stability, and the intangible sensory experience — from its consumers. That Snow Leopard reminds end-users, some media (i.e. not roughlydrafted), and some on Wall Street that Apple is also forged by engineering is a good thing. It highlights that the Halo is in fact grounded in structure and built with powerful and sophisticated tools. Perhaps with an OS X release light on new features yet heavy on retooling with demonstrated performance gains the Halo will no longer be dismissed by some critics as simply ethereal and ‘Kool-Aid’ based; rather, it be understood as a unified, vertically and horizontally digitally-integrated platform into which people through devices plug in to create, communicate, work, sell, share, and enjoy our binary age. Switches ‘left’ or ‘right’, ‘On’ or ‘Off’, ‘Open’ or ‘Closed’, polarity, ’1′ or ’0′ calculated via an Abacus, vacuum tube, card punch, magnetic media, and silicone is engineering at its purist.

Snow Leopard, an engineering second coming? Umm, no. Will it quiet critics, please Wall Street, and satiate Mac users? Well, I guess it depends on what it’ll do for them; or, perhaps more apt, what will its perception of it do for them. What will it do for me? Well, there’ll be satisfaction in knowing that a lot of very talented people put their heart and skills into building something they care deeply about, which ultimately will make my life easier.

Now, where did I put that glass of Kool-Aid….

39 rickla { 07.07.08 at 8:40 am }

Sorry to be pedantic, but the past participle of “lead” is generally considered to be “led”:
http://www.usingenglish.com/reference/irregular-verbs/lead.html

40 Myths of Snow Leopard 8: It’s Just An OS. — RoughlyDrafted Magazine { 07.10.08 at 5:33 am }

[...] Myths of Snow Leopard 4: Exchange is the Only New Feature! Myths of Snow Leopard 5: No Carbon! Myths of Snow Leopard 6: Apple is Out of Ideas! Myths of Snow Leopard 7: Free?! Myths of Snow Leopard 8: It’s Just An [...]

41 What, Where, When, Why & How much - Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard - ThinkTeen Forums { 09.13.08 at 8:45 am }

[...] Myths of Snow Leopard 6: Apple is Out of Ideas! June 27th, 2008 An article touching on aspect Daniel at Roughlydrafted.com’s already talked about in previous articles. Snow Leopard doesn’t indicate Apple is out of ideas for new applications and features – it indicates it’s not willing to promote and advertise features and applications it doesn’t want to talk about yet. Marketing. Jobs and Apple aren’t giving away their grand views of the road ahead, unlike Microsoft. Another aspect is the strange notion that having a list of new applications and features is better (maybe a hangup from drinking Microsoft Kool Aid) rather than wanting features and applications only on merit – only if they’re useful, and worthy enough to be included. From what can be read between the lines of the known confirmed Snow Leopard information thus far, Daniel makes the assertion that Apple has laid out a cohesive strategy for strengthening Snow Leopard

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